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Significado de “burst” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "burst" - Diccionario Inglés

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burstverb

uk   /bɜːst/  us   /bɝːst/ (burst, burst)
B2 [I or T] to break open or apart suddenly, or to make something do this: I hate it when balloons burst. Suddenly the door burst open (= opened suddenly and forcefully) and police officers rushed in. The river was threatening to burst its banks.figurative humorous If I eat any more cake I'll burst (= I cannot eat anything else)!
C2 [I] to feel a strong emotion, or strong wish to do something: I knew they were bursting with curiosity but I said nothing. [+ to infinitive] Tom was bursting to tell everyone the news.UK informal I'm bursting to go to the loo!
burst into flames
C2 to suddenly burn strongly, producing a lot of flames: Smoke started pouring out from underneath, then the truck burst into flames.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

burstnoun [C]

uk   /bɜːst/  us   /bɝːst/
(Definition of burst from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "burst" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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burstverb [I/T]

 us   /bɜrst/ (past tense and past participle burst)
to break open or apart suddenly, or to cause something to break open or apart: [I] Fireworks burst across the night sky. [T] I thought I might have burst a blood vessel.
fig. A person who is bursting is extremely eager or enthusiastic: [I] I was bursting with excitement.

burstnoun [C]

 us   /bɜrst/
a sudden, brief increase in something, or a short appearance of something: With a burst of speed, the horse won easily.
(Definition of burst from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“burst” in British English

“burst” in American English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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