Significado de “cause” - en el Diccionario Inglés

cause en inglés

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causenoun

uk /kɔːz/ us /kɑːz/

cause noun (REASON)

B2 [ C or U ] the reason why something, especially something bad, happens:

The police are still trying to establish the cause of the fire.
She had died of natural causes.
I wouldn't tell you without (good) cause (= if there was not a (good) reason).
I believe we have/there is just cause (= a fair reason) for taking this action.

C2 [ U ] a reason to feel something or to behave in a particular way:

He's never given me any cause for concern.

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cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

C1 [ C ] a socially valuable principle that is strongly supported by some people:

They are fighting for a cause - the liberation of their people.
I'll sponsor you for £10 - it's all in a good cause.

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causeverb [ T ]

uk /kɔːz/ us /kɑːz/

B2 to make something happen, especially something bad:

Most heart attacks are caused by blood clots.
[ + two objects ] I hope the children haven't caused you too much trouble.

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causeconjunction

also 'cause uk /kɒz/ us /kɑːz/ informal

(Definición de cause del Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

cause en inglés americano

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causenoun

us /kɔz/

cause noun (REASON)

[ C/U ] something without which something else would not happen:

[ C ] The investigation will determine the cause of the airplane accident.
[ C ] She studied the causes of human behavior.

[ C/U ] Cause is also reason for doing or feeling something:

[ U ] He had just cause to feel disturbed by these events.
[ U ] There is no cause for alarm.

cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

[ C ] an idea or principle strongly supported by some people:

He devoted himself to charitable causes and gave away millions of dollars.
cause
verb [ T ] us /kɔz/

The wind and rain caused several accidents.

(Definición de cause del Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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cause

I would like to focus on two issues, which are innovative: the commitment to studying the desertification and the relationship with the variables which cause it, such as climate change.
There are also those who call themselves campaigners for consumers' rights who allow themselves to be engaged in this cause and help to drive competitors from the market.
We all know, for example, that the products used in chemotherapy may cause harmful chemicals to be discharged into the environment, but we would not consider banning their authorisation.
Firstly, biofuels help to reduce over-dependence on oil-based fuels, which is a cause for concern as regards both the environment and security of supply.
We have to realise that international conventions need to reflect the new state of play in a considered manner, using procedures which do not cause rifts.
What is beyond doubt is that those who cause damage to the environment in the course of their business have to accept responsibility for it.
Now that many people are bathing and swimming in lakes and seas far from home, however, there is good cause to introduce international safety standards.
The cause of the closure was the discovery of unidentified toxins during testing, even though not a single case of illness has been reported.
In all events, the relation between cause and effect, the logical order, is different from that in which the supplementary question was put.
To have the so-called economic giant settle for the lowest common denominator in its economic, social and environmental conclusions is, however, cause for despair.