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Significado de “cheek” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "cheek" - Diccionario Inglés

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cheeknoun

uk   /tʃiːk/  us   /tʃiːk/
  • cheek noun (FACE)

B1 [C] the soft part of your face that is below your eye and between your mouth and ear: The tears ran down her cheeks. rosy cheeks He embraced her, kissing her on both cheeks.

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  • cheek noun (BEHAVIOUR)

[S or U] UK behaviour or talk that is rude and shows no respect: He told me off for being late when he arrived half an hour after me. What a cheek! [+ to infinitive] She's got some cheek to take your car without asking. He had the cheek to ask me to pay for her! She's always getting into trouble for giving her teachers cheek (= being rude to them).

cheekverb [T]

uk   /tʃiːk/  us   /tʃiːk/ UK informal
to be rude to someone: He's always getting into trouble for cheeking his teachers.
(Definition of cheek from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "cheek" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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cheeknoun

 us   /tʃik/
  • cheek noun (BODY PART)

[C] either side of your face below the eyes, where except at the top the skin has no bone behind it and is therefore soft: She welcomed me with a kiss on the cheek.
  • cheek noun (RUDE BEHAVIOR)

[U] rude behavior or lack of respect: [+ to infinitive] First he messed up my work and then he had the cheek to accuse me of being disorganized.
(Definition of cheek from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“cheek” in American English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

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