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Significado de “come on” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "come on" - Diccionario Inglés

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come on

phrasal verb with come uk   us   /kʌm/ verb (came, come)
  • (START)

C1 to ​start to ​happen or ​work: The ​heating comes on at six in the ​morning. If you have an ​illness coming on, it is ​startinggradually: I ​think I've got a ​cold coming on. UK informal If a woman comes on, her ​period (= the ​blood coming from the womb that ​happens every ​month)starts.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • (SEXUAL INTEREST)

informal to make ​yoursexualinterestknown to someone: Then his ​wifeleft the ​room and he ​started coming on to me. She was coming on strong and, ​naturally, I ​responded.
  • (APPEAR)

(of an ​actor) to ​walk onto the ​stage: There was ​greatapplause when the ​Russianballerina came on.
  • (NOT BELIEVE)

informal used to ​tell someone that you do not ​believe them or that you ​disagree with them, or to show that you are ​angry with them: Oh come on, Kylie, you made the same ​excuse last ​week!

come-onnoun [C]

uk   /ˈkʌm.ɒn/  us   /-ɑːn/ informal
(Definition of come on from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "come on" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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come on

(not standard c’mon)
phrasal verb with come  us   /kʌm/ verb (past tense came  /keɪm/ , past participle come)
  • (HURRY)

used for ​telling someone to move or ​actquickly or more ​quickly: Come on – we’re going to be late if you don’t ​hurry!

come on

(not standard c'mon)
phrasal verb with come  us   /kʌm/ verb (past tense came  /keɪm/ , past participle come)
  • (LACK BELIEF)

used for ​telling someone you do not ​believe what the ​person is saying or you ​think the ​person is not being ​serious: Oh, come on. You have no ​evidencewhatsoever.

come on

phrasal verb with come  us   /kʌm/ verb (past tense came  /keɪm/ , past participle come)
  • (START TO DEVELOP)

to ​start to ​developgradually, as an ​illness or a ​mood: He ​felt one of his ​headaches coming on.

come-onnoun [C]

 /ˈkʌmˌɔn, ˌɑn/ infml
something that is ​intended to ​attract a ​customer to a ​product: Offering ​cash back on a ​purchase is one of the ​oldest come-ons in the ​world.
(Definition of come on from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“come on” in British English

“come on” in American English

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