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Significado de “concede” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "concede" - Diccionario Inglés

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concedeverb

uk   /kənˈsiːd/  us   /kənˈsiːd/
  • concede verb (ADMIT)

C2 [T] to admit, often unwillingly, that something is true: [+ (that)] The government has conceded (that) the new tax policy has been a disaster. [+ speech] "Well okay, perhaps I was a little hard on her," he conceded.
See also
[I or T] to admit that you have lost in a competition: He kept on arguing and wouldn't concede defeat. She conceded even before all the votes had been counted.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • concede verb (GIVE AWAY)

C2 [T] to allow someone to have something, even if you do not want to: The president is not expected to concede these reforms. He is not willing to concede any of his power/authority. Britain conceded (= allowed) independence to India in 1947.
(Definition of concede from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "concede" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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concedeverb

 us   /kənˈsid/
to admit that something is true, or to allow something: [+ (that) clause] Officials concede (that) the plan isn’t the best one.
If you concede in a competition, you admit that you have lost: [I/T] She conceded (the election) yesterday.
(Definition of concede from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "concede" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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concedeverb

uk   us   /kənˈsiːd/
[T] to admit that something exists or is true, often unwillingly: concede that The chairman conceded that shareholders had been "impacted by the decline in market prices". The insurers ultimately conceded liability for repairing the damage to the car.
[T] to give something to someone, or allow them to have it, especially when you are unwilling to do so: Local government has been forced to concede some of its authority to larger, regionally based, units.
[I or T] to stop arguing, fighting, or competing against someone and admit that you have lost: After a recount of the votes, the candidate conceded defeat. Critics say he should have conceded right after the election.
See also
(Definition of concede from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“concede” in British English

“concede” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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