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Significado de “control” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "control" - Diccionario Inglés

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controlverb [T]

uk   /kənˈtrəʊl/  us   /kənˈtroʊl/ (-ll-)
B1 to ​order, ​limit, or ​rule something, or someone's ​actions or ​behaviour: If you can't control ​yourdog, put it on a ​lead! You're going to have to ​learn to control ​yourtemper. The ​temperature is controlled by a ​thermostat. The ​laws controlling ​drugs are very ​strict in this ​country. The ​government is ​trying to control ​spending.

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controlnoun

uk   /kənˈtrəʊl/  us   /kənˈtroʊl/
  • control noun (POWER)

B2 [C or U] the ​act of controlling something or someone, or the ​power to do this: She doesn't have any control over that ​child - it's ​embarrassing. He ​wants the ​government to imposestrict controls ondogownership. The ​dictator took control of the ​country in 1933. He ​felt he was losing control ofevents. You need to ​stay in control ofyouremotions. The ​carskidded and went out of control, ​crashing into an ​oncomingtruck. There was nothing we could do about it - the ​situation was out of/beyond/​outsideour control. She ​criticized the police's ​methods of crowd control.
under control
B2 being ​dealt with or ​limitedsuccessfully: It ​seems that the ​disease is now under control. Everything is under control, ​sir. It took them two ​hours to bring/get the ​fire under control.

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  • control noun (SWITCH)

B2 [C] a ​switch or other ​device used to ​operate a ​machine such as a ​vehicle: The ​maininstruments are in the ​centre of the control panel. Captain Firth ​sat at the controls of the ​aircraft.
[C usually singular] (also control key, written abbreviation Ctrl) a ​key on a ​computerkeyboard that you ​press at the same ​time as other ​keys to make the ​keyboardoperate in a ​particular way: Press and ​hold down the control ​key while you ​press 9. I ​pressed Control Alt Delete but nothing ​happened.
(Definition of control from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "control" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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controlnoun [C/U]

 us   /kənˈtroʊl/
the ​ability or ​power to ​decide or ​stronglyinfluence the ​particular way in which something will ​happen or someone will ​behave, or the ​condition of having such ​ability or ​power: [U] The first few ​months he was ​running the ​company, Randy didn’t really ​feel in control. [U] The man ​lost control of his ​car and ​crashed into a ​tree. [U] The ​fire was out of control for ​nearly two ​hours before ​firefighters were ​able to get it under control.
A control is a ​rule or ​law that sets a ​limit on something: [C] She ​argued for ​tightening controls on ​airpollution.

controlverb [T]

 us   /kənˈtroʊl/ (-ll-)
to ​decide or ​stronglyinfluence the ​particular way in which something will ​happen or someone will ​behave: It’s hard to control ​yourtemper when you’re two ​yearsold. The ​temperature is controlled by a ​thermostat.
(Definition of control from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "control" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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controlverb [T]

uk   us   /kənˈtrəʊl/
to be in ​charge of something or someone and have the ​power to make decisions ​relating to them: The Chicago-based ​holdingcompany controls a ​globalnetwork of ​advertising and ​publicrelationsagencies. Within five ​years the ​techfirm controlled 60% of the ​Europeanmarket.
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to own the most ​shares in a ​company and be the ​mainowner: Avis' ​employees control the ​company through an ​employeestockoptionprogram.
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to own a particular ​number of the ​shares in a ​company, and be one of its ​owners: She controls 7.5% of the ​company.control a stake in sth They ​currently control a 20% ​stake in the ​textilefirm.
to ​limit the ​amount by which something is ​allowed to ​change, ​develop, or ​increase: If the ​program is ​adopted, the ​supply and ​price of sugar will be controlled through ​subsidies and ​importquotas.
to ​deal with a problem or ​situation successfully and ​stop it from becoming worse: control inflation/spending/debts Corporate ​spending was ​cut by 15% in an ​effort to control ​spirallingdebts.
to make a ​machine, ​system, ​process, etc. ​operate in the way you want it to: All of the building's ​lighting and heating ​systems are controlled ​automatically.

controlnoun

uk   us   /kənˈtrəʊl/
[U] the ​power to give ​orders, make decisions, and take ​responsibility for something: take/keep/gain control of sth Banks threatened to take control of the ​business. Both ​parties are vying for control of the Senate.
[U] the ​ability to make someone or something do what you want: control over sb/sth Critics ​claim he was an ineffective ​manager, with virtually no control over his ​staff.seize/take control of sth Malware can ​seize control of a ​computer and use it for ​financialscams.
[U] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET a large ​number of ​sharesowned by one ​person or ​group, which gives them ​power to control its ​management: The family ​plans to ​sell control of its ​publishingempire for $2.5 ​billion.
[C or U] a ​limit on something, or the ​act of ​limiting something in ​order to ​stop it from becoming worse: control on sth If the ​independentoperatorscorner the ​market there will be very little control on ​prices.strict/tight/tough controls Managers need to ​keep a ​tight control on ​costs.impose/introduce/tighten controls The ​governmentimposed controls that ​requiredvendors to ​sell some ​items below ​costprice.relax/remove/loosen control Controls were relaxed so that US ​manufacturers could ​participate more ​aggressively in the ​internationalmarket.
[C, usually plural] a ​switch or a ​piece of ​equipment with ​switches on it, used for ​operating a ​machine or ​vehicle: The ​plant was ​updated with new control ​panels for its ​industrialmachinery. Investigators are still ​trying to ​determine who was at the controls when the ​company jet ​crashed.
[C] MARKETING →  control group
[U] IT →  control key
in control
controlling something or having the ​power to control something: When ​negotiating a ​deal, it’s important that you remain calm and in control.be in control of sth She ​moved out of Sales and is now in control of the Marketing ​department.
out of control
if something is out of control, it cannot be dealt with successfully: be/get/spiral out of control One of their biggest ​priorities is to prevent ​costs from getting out of control.
under control
if a ​situation is under control, it is being dealt with successfully and is unlikely to ​create any problems: bring/get/keep sth under control The Fed would likely ​raiserates gradually to ​keepinflation under control.
(Definition of control from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“control” in American English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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a small amount of something that shows you what the rest is or should be like

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