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Significado de “damage” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "damage" - Diccionario Inglés

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damageverb [T]

uk   /ˈdæm.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈdæm.ɪdʒ/
B1 to ​harm or ​spoil something: Many ​buildings were badly damaged during the ​war. It was a ​scandal that damaged a lot of ​reputations.

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damagenoun

uk   /ˈdæm.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈdæm.ɪdʒ/
B1 [U] harm or ​injury: Strong ​winds had ​causedserious damage to the ​roof. Recent ​discoveries about ​corruption have doneserious damage to the company's ​reputation. The ​doctors were ​worried that he might have ​suffered brain damage.
damages [plural]
money that is ​paid to someone by a ​person or ​organization who has been ​responsible for ​causing them some ​injury or ​loss: The ​politician was awarded £50,000 in damages over ​falseallegations made by the ​newspaper. The ​police have been ​ordered to paysubstantial damages to the ​families of the two ​deadboys.

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(Definition of damage from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "damage" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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damageverb [T]

 us   /ˈdæm·ɪdʒ/
to ​harm or ​spoil something: Many ​buildings were ​badly damaged by the ​earthquake. News ​reports damaged the senator’s ​reputation.

damagenoun [U]

 us   /ˈdæm·ɪdʒ/
harm or ​injury: The ​fire did ​serious damage to the ​buildings. He ​sufferedbrain damage in the ​accident.
(Definition of damage from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "damage" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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damagenoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈdæmɪdʒ/
harm that is done to someone or something that makes them less ​successful: damage to sth/sb The ​firm was lucky to get away with little damage to its ​reputation.do/cause damage (to sth/sb) The ​pensionsscandal did a lot of damage to the Government's credibility.inflict damage on sth/sb Public ​relationsdisasters could inflict damage on the ​brand. The ​solicitors say their ​clients will ​hold the ​bankliable for any ​loss and damage suffered as a ​result of the ​arrangements. severe/irreparable/serious damage economic/​financial damage
physicalharm that is done to something: They ​asked their ​insurers to assess the damage so that they could make a ​claim.do/cause damage (to sth) The ​governmentestimates the damage done by the ​fires at millions of ​pounds. Roofs are most likely to suffer damage during a hurricane. storm/wind/water damage severe/irreparable/serious damage environmental/​structural damage
damages [plural]
LAW money that a ​person or ​organization is ​ordered by a ​court of ​law to ​pay to another ​person or ​organization because they are ​responsible for ​harming them in some way: They want the ​rivalcompany to ​withdraw the ​product and pay damages.£140,000/$12 million, etc. in damages Juries have been handing out millions of ​dollars in damages for ​minorinjuries. A ​partyfailing to ​fulfil their ​part of the ​contract will presumably be liable for damages.award damages (to sb) In ​addition to the damages ​awarded to Robertson, his wife was ​awarded $500,000.claim/seek/sue for damages (for sth) He was ​seeking damages for ​breach of ​contract,.be awarded/receive/recover damages (for sth) If the ​odds of ​survivalfell because of a missed diagnosis, victims would be able to ​try to ​recover damages.
the damage is done
harm has been caused and it is too late to ​change the ​situation: Even though he was acquitted, the damage was done.

damageverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈdæmɪdʒ/
to ​harm someone or something in a way that makes them less ​successful: The ​Chancellor is being urged not to take ​steps that could damage Britain's ​competitiveness. They feared that ​publicknowledge of the ​deal might damage them.seriously/severely/irreparably damage sb/sth He is ​suing his ​colleague on the ​grounds that her accusations severely damaged his ​reputation.
to physically ​harm something: People who are under-insured won't be able to ​rebuild if their homes are damaged by a hurricane.seriously/severely/irreparably damage sth The ​fire completely destroyed five ​buildings and severely damaged several more.
(Definition of damage from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“damage” in British English

“damage” in American English

“damage” in Business English

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