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Significado de “deep” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "deep" - Diccionario Inglés

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deepadjective

uk   us   /diːp/

deep adjective (LONG WAY DOWN)

A2 going or being a ​long way down from the ​top or ​surface, or being of a ​particulardistance from the ​top to the ​bottom: a deep well/mine a deep ​river/​sea a deep ​cut The ​hole is so deep you can't ​see the ​bottom. The water's not deep here - ​look, I can ​touch the ​bottom. Drill 20 ​holes, each 2 ​inches deep. The water's only ankle/​knee/waist-deep, so we'll be ​able to get ​across the ​rivereasily. Take a few deep breaths (= breaths that ​fill the ​lungs with ​air) and ​calm down.
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deep adjective (STRONGLY FELT)

B2 very ​stronglyfelt or ​experienced and usually ​lasting a ​longtime: Their ​son has been a deep ​disappointment to them. We're in deep ​trouble. She ​fell into a deep ​sleep.
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deep adjective (LOW)

B2 (of a ​sound) ​low: a ​wonderfully deep ​voice
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deep adjective (COMPLICATED)

C2 showing or ​needingseriousthought, or not ​easy to ​understand: His ​films are ​generally too deep for me.
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deep adjective (FRONT TO BACK)

B2 If something is deep, it has a ​largedistance between ​itsedges, ​especially between ​itsfront and back ​edges: Is the ​alcove deep enough for ​bookshelves? The ​wardrobe is 2 m high, 1 m ​wide and 60 cm deep. By ​midnight, there were ​customersstanding six deep (= in six ​rows) at the ​bar.deep in/inside/within sth B1 near the ​middle of something, and a ​longdistance from ​itsedges: Little ​Red Riding Hood's ​grandmotherlived in a ​house deep in the ​forest.

deep adjective (DARK)

B1 (of a ​colour) ​strong and ​dark: The ​sky was deep ​blue.

deepadverb

uk   us   /diːp/

deepnoun

uk   us   /diːp/
(Definition of deep from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "deep" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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deepadjective, adverb [-er/-est only]

 us   /dip/

deep adjective, adverb [-er/-est only] (DOWN)

going or being a ​long way down from the ​top or ​surface, or being at a ​particulardistance down from the ​top: She had a deep ​cut on her ​leftarm. During the ​flood, the ​water in the ​basement was ​knee-deep (= it would ​reach the ​knees of an ​averageadult).

deepadjective

 us   /dip/

deep adjective (FRONT TO BACK)

having a (sometimes ​stated) ​distance from ​front to back: I ​want the ​bookcaseshelves to be 12 ​inches deep. The ​crowd along the ​paraderoute was six deep (= in six ​rows).

deep adjective (STRONGLY FELT)

stronglyfelt or ​experienced, or having a ​strong and ​lastingeffect: Our deep ​love for each other will last ​forever. He ​awoke from a deep ​sleep. Joseph, deep in ​thought (= ​thinking so much that he is not ​aware of ​others), didn’t ​hear Erin ​enter the ​room.

deep adjective (COMPLICATED)

[-er/-est only] difficult to ​understand; ​complicated: His ​book on how the ​brainworks is too deep for me.

deep adjective (LOW SOUND)

[-er/-est only] (of a ​sound) ​low: He was a ​large man with a deep ​voice.

deep adjective (DARK)

[-er/-est only] (of a ​color) ​strong and ​dark: The ​sky is a deep ​blue.
(Definition of deep from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "deep" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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deepadjective [usually before noun]

uk   us   /diːp/
very large or serious: Employees were ​forced to ​accept deep ​cuts in ​pay and ​benefits. a deep ​recession. These deep ​discounts will be a ​majorfactor in ​stimulatinglocaltelephonecompetition in Pennsylvania.
in deep trouble experiencing very serious problems: But the ​question is whether any ​businessstrategy can ​save a ​company in such deep trouble.
be in/get into deep water to be in or get into serious trouble: The ​main problem's going to be ​cashflow. It's the same in any ​business that gets into deep water.
deep in debt owing a very large ​amount of ​money: Why are the ​bankswilling to ​allowpeople like this to get ​even deeper into ​debt?
deep pockets if you say that an ​organization or a ​person has deep ​pockets, you ​mean that they have a lot of ​money to ​spend: The sleek new ​car promises to do well, but it ​takes deep ​pockets to ​marketpremiumcars across ​Europe.
jump in/throw sb in at the deep end to ​start, or make someone ​start, doing something new and difficult without ​help or preparation: When new ​peoplestart in our ​callcentre, we give them basic ​training in all our ​systems and then ​throw them in at the deep end on day one.
(Definition of deep from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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