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Significado de “depth” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "depth" - Diccionario Inglés

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depthnoun

uk   /depθ/ us   /depθ/
  • depth noun (DISTANCE DOWN)

B1 [C or U] the distance down either from the top of something to the bottom, or to a distance below the top surface of something: the depth of a lake/pond There are very few fish at depths (= distances below the surface) below 3,000 metres. The river froze to a depth of over a metre.
the depths [plural] literary
the lowest part of the sea: The ship sank slowly to the depths of the ocean.

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  • depth noun (SERIOUSNESS)

B2 [C or U] the state of having serious qualities or the ability to think seriously about something: Terry lacks depth - he's a very superficial person. Her writing shows astonishing depth. Jo has hidden depths (= serious qualities that you do not see immediately).
in depth
B2 in a serious and detailed way: I'd like to look at this question in some depth.

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  • depth noun (STRENGTH)

C2 [C or U] the fact of a feeling, state, or characteristic being strong, extreme, or detailed: He spoke with great depth of feeling. I was amazed at the depth of her knowledge.
in the depth(s) of sth
experiencing an extreme and negative emotion: He was in the depths of despair/depression about losing his job.
during the worst period of a bad situation: The company was started in the depth of the recession of the 1930s.
(Definition of depth from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "depth" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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depthnoun [C/U]

us   /depθ/
  • depth noun [C/U] (DISTANCE DOWN)

the distance down from the top surface of something to the bottom: [C] They were scuba diving at a depth of 22 meters. [U] The numbers on the left show the depth in inches.
  • depth noun [C/U] (DISTANCE BACKWARD)

the distance from the front to the back of something: [U] Bookshelves should be at least nine inches in depth.
  • depth noun [C/U] (STRENGTH)

the strength, quality, or degree of being complete: [U] It’s hard to get a handle on the depth of her knowledge.
  • depth noun [C/U] (SERIOUSNESS)

the ability to think seriously about something: [U] Don’t look for depth in this show.
in depth
Something done in depth is done carefully and in great detail: I interviewed her in depth. an in-depth report
(Definition of depth from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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