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Significado de “gross” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "gross" - Diccionario Inglés

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grossadjective, adverb

uk   /ɡrəʊs/  us   /ɡroʊs/
C1 (in) ​total: A person's gross income is the ​money they ​earn before ​tax is ​deducted from it. Once ​wrapped, the gross weight of the ​package is 2.1 kg. She ​earns £30,000 a ​year gross.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

grossadjective

uk   /ɡrəʊs/  us   /ɡroʊs/

grossverb [T]

uk   /ɡrəʊs/  us   /ɡroʊs/
to ​earn a ​particularamount of ​money before ​tax is ​paid or ​costs are taken away: The ​film has grossed over $200 million this ​year.
Phrasal verbs

grossnoun [C]

uk   /ɡrəʊs/  us   /ɡroʊs/ (plural gross) old-fashioned
(Definition of gross from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "gross" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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grossadjective

 us   /ɡroʊs/
  • gross adjective (EXTREME)

[-er/-est only] (esp. of something ​bad or ​wrong) ​extreme or ​obvious: The ​birdsdie from ​hunger, ​thirst, and gross ​overcrowding.
  • gross adjective (UNPLEASANT)

[-er/-est only] infml rude or ​offensive: She ​watches these really gross ​movies. "Gross!" Pamela says as she ​wipes the ​goo off her ​fingers.
  • gross adjective (TOTAL)

[not gradable] (of ​earnings) ​total, before ​tax is ​paid or ​costs are ​subtracted: Investors have ​earned gross ​income of $780 million.

grossverb [T]

 us   /ɡroʊs/
to ​earn as a ​total before ​expenses are ​subtracted: The ​film grossed over $200 million.
Phrasal verbs

grossnoun

 us   /ɡroʊs/
  • gross noun (NUMBER)

[C] (plural gross) a ​group of 144 ​items
(Definition of gross from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "gross" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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grossadjective

uk   us   /ɡrəʊs/
FINANCE, TAX, ACCOUNTING used to describe a ​totalamount of ​money before ​tax, etc. is taken off: gross earnings/income/revenue The ​companyposted gross ​earnings of $150.8 million. gross ​salary/​wagesgross interest/return/yield Basic-rate ​taxpayers need to ​earn 4% gross ​interest to ​beatinflation.
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[before noun] formal LAW extremely ​bad: gross ​misconduct/​mismanagement/​negligence

grossadverb

uk   us   /ɡrəʊs/
FINANCE, TAX, ACCOUNTING before ​tax, etc. is taken off: He ​earns €75,000 a ​year gross.

grossverb [T]

uk   us   /ɡrəʊs/
FINANCE to ​earn a ​totalamount before ​tax, etc. is taken off: He grossed over $100,000 last ​year.
COMMERCE to ​earn a particular ​amount in ​ticketsales: It has become the highest grossing film of all ​time.
Phrasal verbs

grossnoun [C]

uk   us   /ɡrəʊs/
COMMERCE the ​totalamount of ​money that a film makes in ​sales of cinema ​tickets: a gross of sth His latest film ​opened with a gross of just $6 million.
FINANCE the ​amount that a ​person or ​businessearns before ​tax and ​costs have been taken away: a gross of sth Her ​company showed a 25% ​profit on a gross of about $200,000 in 2010.
MEASURES a ​quantity of 144 of something: a gross of sth a gross of apples
(Definition of gross from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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