hot Significado en Diccionario Cambridge Inglés
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Significado de “hot” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "hot" - Diccionario Inglés

See all translations

hotadjective

uk   /hɒt/  us   /hɑːt/ (hotter, hottest)

hot adjective (VERY WARM)

A1 having a high ​temperature: a hot, ​sunnyday hot ​weather a hot ​drink/​meal It's too hot in here, can we ​turn down the ​heating? Bake the ​cake in a hot ​oven, about 220°C, for 30 ​minutes. The ​food was piping hot (= very hot).
More examples

hot adjective (SPICY)

B1 used to ​describefood that ​causes a ​burningfeeling in the ​mouth: a hot ​curry hot, ​spicyfood
Opposite
More examples

hot adjective (CAUSING DISAGREEMENT)

C1 used to ​describe a ​subject that ​causes a lot of ​disagreement or ​discussion: Global ​warming has ​become a very hot ​issue.

hot adjective (NEW/EXCITING)

C1 new and ​exciting: Hollywood's hottest new ​actress hot ​gossip This 21-year-old ​actor has ​become Hollywood's hottest property.
More examples

hot adjective (SKILFUL)

[after verb] informal knowing a lot or ​skilful: I'm not too hot onRussianhistory.

hot adjective (MOST LIKELY)

hot tip informal an ​accuratepiece of ​advice about who will ​win a ​race: Do you have any hot ​tips for this afternoon's ​race?hot favourite UK the ​person or ​animal that is most ​likely to ​win a ​race, ​competition, ​election, etc.: He's the hot ​favourite towin the ​election.

hot adjective (DEMANDING)

be hot on sth UK informal to ​think that a ​particular thing is very ​important and to ​demand that it is done well or ​correctly: They're very hot on ​dress at ​work so she always ​looks very ​smart for the ​office.

hot adjective (STOLEN)

slang Hot ​goods have been ​recentlystolen and are ​thereforedifficult to ​sell or ​dangerous to ​deal with because the ​police are still ​looking for them.

hot adjective (SEXY)

informal sexuallyattractive, or ​feelingsexuallyexcited: She's really hot! I'm hot for you, ​baby. I've got a hot datetonight.

hot adjective (ANGRY)

hot temper If someone has a hot ​temper, they are ​easily made ​angry.
(Definition of hot from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "hot" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

See all translations

hotadjective

 us   /hɑt/

hot adjective (VERY WARM)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) having a high ​temperature: a hot ​day a hot ​meal It’s hotter in Ohio than it is here. Matt makes his little ​sister hot ​chocolate (= a ​warmdrink made with ​chocolate).

hot adjective (SPICY)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) (of ​food) causing a ​feeling in the ​mouth like ​burning or tingling (= as if a lot of ​sharppoints are being put in ​quickly and ​lightly): If you like ​curry really hot, you can ​add some hot ​peppers and hot ​sauce.

hot adjective (ANGRY)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) easilyexcited, or ​angry: She’s hot-tempered. I got really hot about them not ​recycling.

hot adjective (GOOD)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) infml very good and having ​energy: Right now the ​stockmarket is hot. The show isn’t so hot. He doesn’t ​feel so hot.

hot adjective (STOLEN)

[not gradable] slang (of ​goods) ​stolen and ​thereforedifficult to ​sell: Those CD ​players are so ​cheap, they must be hot.

hot adjective (DANGEROUS)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) infml (of a ​situation) ​dangerous or ​difficult; risky : Things got a lot hotter when the ​military took over.

hot adjective (ATTRACTIVE)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) slang physicallyattractive
(Definition of hot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de hot
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Palabra del día

chestnut

a large tree with leaves divided into five parts and large round nuts that can be eaten

Palabra del día

In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
by Liz Walter,
September 02, 2015
Several readers have asked for information on prepositions, so I will start with a blog post that looks at an area where they are really important: travel. The first thing to remember is that we use to (and not ‘in’) after the verb go: We are going to London. I went to

Aprende más 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Aprende más