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Significado de “join” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "join" - Diccionario Inglés

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joinverb

uk   /dʒɔɪn/  us   /dʒɔɪn/
  • join verb (CONNECT)

B1 [T] to ​connect or ​fasten things together: A ​longsuspensionbridge joins the two ​islands. Join the two ​pieces together using ​strongglue. The ​island is joined to the ​mainland by a ​roadbridge. If you join (up) the ​dots on the ​paper, you'll get a ​picture.
B1 [I or T] If ​roads or ​rivers join, they ​meet at a ​particularpoint: The A11 joins the M11 ​south of Cambridge. The River Murray and the River Darling join ​east of Adelaide.

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  • join verb (DO TOGETHER)

A2 [I or T] to get ​involved in an ​activity or ​journey with another ​person or ​group: I don't have ​time for a ​drink now, but I'll join you ​later. Why don't you ​askyoursister if she would like to join us forsupper? We took the ​ferryacross the Channel and then joined (= got on) the Paris ​train at Calais. If you're ​buyingtickets, ​please join the queue (= ​stand at the end of it). I'm ​sure everyone will join me inwishing you a very ​happyretirement (= everyone ​else will do this too). The ​police have joined with (= they have ​begun to ​work with) the Drug Enforcement Agency intrying to ​catchmajordrugtraffickers. The ​designcompany is ​planning to join up with a ​shoemanufacturer and ​create a new ​line of ​footwear.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • If you ​wanttickets you'll have to join the ​queue.
  • Would you like to join us for ​dinnertonight?
  • "Do you ​want to join me on a ten-mile ​run?" "Not ​likely !"
  • "Come in and join the festivities - what will you have to ​drink?"
  • I ​hope they won't ​think I'm anti-social if I don't join them in the ​bar.
  • join verb (BECOME A MEMBER)

A2 [I or T] to ​become a ​member of an ​organization: I ​felt so ​unfit after ​Christmas that I ​decided to join a ​gym. It's a ​greatclub. Why don't you join?
join the ranks
to ​become one of a ​particularlargegroup of ​people: When I ​leaveschool at the end of this ​month, I'll ​probably have to join the ​ranks of the ​unemployed.

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Phrasal verbs

joinnoun [C]

uk   /dʒɔɪn/  us   /dʒɔɪn/
(Definition of join from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "join" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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joinverb [I/T]

 us   /dʒɔɪn/
  • join verb [I/T] (DO WITH)

to do something with or be with someone or something: [T] Why don’t you ​askyoursister if she would like to join us for ​dinner? [T] I’m ​sure everyone will join me in ​wishing you a very ​happybirthday. [I] Won’t you join with us in ​planning the ​party?
  • join verb [I/T] (BECOME A MEMBER)

to ​become a ​member of an ​organization: [T] I’ve ​decided to join a ​gym. [I] It’s a ​greatclub – why don’t you join?
  • join verb [I/T] (FASTEN)

to ​cause something to be ​attached or ​fastened to another thing, or to ​bring two or more things together in this way; ​connect: [T] A ​longsuspensionbridge joins the ​island with the ​mainland.
If ​roads or ​rivers join, they ​meet at a ​particularpoint: [I] The Missouri River and Mississippi River join ​north of St. Louis.
join hands
If two or more ​people join ​hands, they ​hold each other’s ​hands, esp. before doing some ​activity: This ​folkdancebegins with everyone joining ​hands to ​form a ​circle.
(Definition of join from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "join" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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joinverb

uk   us   /dʒɔɪn/
[T] to ​connect or fasten two or more things together: join sth to sth Small screws are used to join the ​frontpanel to the ​sides.join sth together The ​pieces are joined together with glue.
[I or T] to become a ​member of a ​club, etc., or to ​startworking for a ​company or an ​organization: Have you joined the ​pensionplan? I joined the ​company immediately after college.
[I or T] to get involved in an ​activity with another ​person or ​group: join sb for sth Will you join us for dinner?join sb in doing sth I'm sure everyone will join me in wishing James a very happy ​retirement.
[I or T] TRANSPORT to get on a bus, ​train, or ​plane: Passengers who joined at Manchester should have their ​ticketsready for ​inspection.
join the dots
to ​connect two things or ​ideas in ​order to ​produce something new, or to show the ​relationship between different things: We need to join the ​dots between our ​currentproducts and the ​needs of this new ​market.
join forces
to ​act with somebody else in ​order to do something: The two ​companies have joined ​forces to make the Web ​applicationsavailable to a wider ​public.

joinnoun [C]

uk   us   /dʒɔɪn/
a ​place where two things ​meet or are ​connected together: Oil is ​leaking out at the join between the two pipes.
(Definition of join from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“join” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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