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Significado de “knock” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "knock" - Diccionario Inglés

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knockverb

uk   /nɒk/  us   /nɑːk/

knock verb (MAKE NOISE)

B1 [I] to ​repeatedlyhit something, ​producing a ​noise: She knocked on the ​window to ​attract his ​attention. There's someone knocking on/at the ​door. Please knock before ​entering. [I] specialized engineering If an ​engine is knocking, it is ​producing a ​repeated high ​sound either because the ​fuel is not ​burningcorrectly or because a ​smallpart is ​damaged and is ​thereforeallowing another ​part to ​move in ​ways that it should not. [I] If something such as a ​pipe knocks, it makes a ​repeated high ​sound.
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knock verb (HIT)

B1 [I + adv/prep, T] to ​hit, ​especiallyforcefully, and ​cause to ​move or ​fall: He ​accidentally knocked the ​vase off the ​table. She knocked her ​head against the ​wall as she ​fell. Who knocked over that ​mug of ​coffee? [+ obj + adj ] Some ​thug knocked him unconscious/​senseless. She took a ​hammer and knocked a ​hole in the ​wall.knock into each other/knock through If you knock two ​rooms into each other or knock two ​rooms through, you ​remove the ​wall between them so that they ​form one ​room.
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knock verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] UK informal to ​criticize, ​especiallyunfairly: Don't knock him - he's doing his ​best.

knocknoun [C]

uk   /nɒk/  us   /nɑːk/

knock noun [C] (NOISE)

a ​suddenshortnoise made when someone or something ​hits a ​surface: There was a knock at/on the ​door.

knock noun [C] (HIT)

the ​act of something hard ​hitting a ​person or thing: He ​received a ​nasty knock on the ​head from a ​fallingslate.
(Definition of knock from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "knock" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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knockverb

 us   /nɑk/

knock verb (MAKE NOISE)

[I] to ​repeatedlyhit something, ​producing a ​noise: Someone is knocking at the ​door. Jane knocked on the ​window to ​attract his ​attention. [I] If an ​engine is knocking, it makes a ​repeatednoise because of a ​mechanicalproblem.

knock verb (MOVE)

[T] to ​push into something or someone, often ​forcefully, causing the thing or ​person to move: Alice ​accidentally knocked the ​pot off the ​table. The ​blast knocked him off his ​feet.

knock verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] infml to ​criticize, esp. ​unfairly: She knocks every ​suggestion I make.
(Definition of knock from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "knock" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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knockverb [T]

uk   us   /nɒk/
to cause a sudden and unexpected ​change in something such as ​prices: His ​downbeatassessment knocked the company's ​shareprice enough to ensure that it ​failed to rejoin the FTSE 100. Analysts have warned that ​pricecuts and ​slowingsales would knock ​profits.
to affect someone or something badly: The ​hotel and ​conferencesector has been knocked sideways by a ​catalogue of problems in recent ​years. Manufacturing ​redundancies in the ​area are knockingbuyers' confidence.be knocked by sth The ​financialmarkets were badly knocked by the week's ​political turmoil.
informal to criticize something or someone: Critics may knock the ​company, but it's still a good ​investment. You can knock him for some things, but you have to give him ​credit for his ​record.
come knocking informal to visit or ​talk to someone in ​order to ​ask for something: We ​assistsmallcompanies that want to ​expand their ​capabilities - if they come knocking, we don't ​turn them down.
knock on/at sb's door informal to ​talk to a ​person or an ​organization because you want them to ​help you, or you want to ​join them: In the two ​years since it ​launched its first ​plan, nearly 218,000 ​investors have knocked on its door. In 1911, 39 ​percent of Britain's ​working women were ​domestic servants, now they are knocking at the ​boardroom door.
knock sth on the head UK informal to prevent something from ​happening, or to ​finallyfinish something: The ​company knocked ​housingmarketconcerns on the ​head with a 32% ​rise in full-year ​profits.
knock spots off sth/sb UK informal to be much better than something or someone else: This ingenious colour viewfinder knocks ​spots off ​currentLCDdisplays.
knock sth/sb into shape informal to take ​action to get something or someone into good ​condition: His ​arrival on the ​board has ​finally knocked the ​company into ​shape.
knock the bottom out of sth to ​damage something severely, especially by destroying its ​support: The ​rise in ​mortgagerates really knocked the ​bottom out of the ​housingmarket.

knocknoun [C]

uk   us   /nɒk/
a ​situation in which something is badly affected: Sales of champagne were up over the ​key Christmas ​period despite earlier fears of a knock inconsumer confidence.
informal a ​badexperience: take/suffer/have a knock In him, we see a man, toughened by his ​share of hard knocks, who's had to ​struggle for every ​success.
a criticism of someone or something: a knock on sb/sth The biggest knock on ​internetphones is that they're only as ​reliable as your ​broadbandconnection.
(Definition of knock from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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