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Significado de “loan” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "loan" - Diccionario Inglés

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loannoun

uk   /ləʊn/ us   /loʊn/
  • loan noun (SUM)

B1 [C] an amount of money that is borrowed, often from a bank, and has to be paid back, usually together with an extra amount of money that you have to pay as a charge for borrowing: She's trying to get a $50,000 loan to start her own business. We could apply for/take out a loan to buy a car.

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  • loan noun (BORROW)

C1 [C or U] an act of borrowing or lending something: Thank you very much for the loan of your bike. This exhibit is on loan (= being borrowed/lent) from/to another museum.

loanverb [T]

uk   /ləʊn/ us   /loʊn/
to lend: This library loans books and CDs. [+ two objects] I'd loan you the money if I could./I'd loan the money to you if I could.
(Definition of loan from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "loan" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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loannoun [C/U]

us   /loʊn/
an act of lending something, esp. a sum of money that that has to be paid back with interest (= an additional amount of money that is a percentage of the amount borrowed), or an amount of money that has been lent: [U] Thanks for the loan of your bike. [C] My brother repaid his student loan within five years. The painting is on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (= has been lent to it, esp. for more than a short period of time).

loanverb [T]

us   /loʊn/
to lend something, esp. money: Can you loan me $10 until payday?
(Definition of loan from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "loan" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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loannoun [C]

uk   /ləʊn/ us   FINANCE
money that someone borrows from a bank or other financial organization for a period of time during which they pay interest: a loan to sb/sth The bank's portfolio of loans to commercial and industrial firms shrank from $15.7 billion the previous year to $12.7 billion.get/take out/apply for a loan Before you take out a loan sit down and list all the money you have coming in.pay off/pay back/repay a loan New restrictions require lenders to check a person's income and ability to repay the loan.provide/give/make a loan World banks injected as much as $64 billion into global money markets to encourage banks to make loans again. approve/refuse a loan a low-interest/fixed-rate/interest-only loan Banks and particularly building societies expect the amount of loans in arrears to increase.

loanverb [T]

uk   /ləʊn/ us  
to lend someone something: loan sb sth/loan sth to sb The finance report showed that a wealthy donor had loaned his campaign $1.15 million. Lenders who loaned money for more than houses were worth have become victims of the economic downturn.
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(Definition of loan from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“loan” in British English

“loan” in American English

“loan” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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