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Significado de “nail” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "nail" - Diccionario Inglés

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nailnoun [C]

uk   us   /neɪl/
  • nail noun [C] (METAL)

B2 a ​small, ​thinpiece of ​metal with one ​pointed end and one ​flat end that you ​hit into something with a ​hammer, ​especially in ​order to ​fasten or ​join it to something ​else: a three-inch nail I ​stepped on a nail ​sticking out of the ​floorboards. Hammer a nail into the ​wall and we'll ​hang the ​mirror from it.

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  • nail noun [C] (BODY PART)

B2 a ​thin, hard ​area that ​covers the ​upperside of the end of each ​finger and each ​toe: Stop bitingyour nails! nail ​clippers a nail ​file

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nailverb

uk   us   /neɪl/
  • nail verb (FASTEN)

[T + adv/prep] to ​fasten something with nails: She had nailed a ​smallshelf to the ​door. A ​notice had been nailed up on the ​wall. The ​lid of the ​box had been nailed down.
  • nail verb (CATCH)

[T] slang to ​catch someone, ​especially when they are doing something ​wrong, or to make it ​clear that they are ​guilty: The ​police had been ​trying to nail those ​guys for ​months.
(Definition of nail from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "nail" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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nailnoun [C]

 us   /neɪl/
  • nail noun [C] (METAL)

a ​thinpiece of ​metal having a ​pointed end that is ​forced into ​wood or another ​substance by ​hitting the other end with a ​hammer, and is used esp. to ​join two ​pieces or to ​hold something in ​place
  • nail noun [C] (BODY PART)

the hard, ​smoothpart at the ​upper end of each ​finger and ​toe

nailverb [T]

 us   /neɪl/
  • nail verb [T] (FASTEN)

to ​attach or ​fasten with a nail or nails: [M] Workmen were nailing down the ​carpet. If you nail something ​shut, you put nails in it to ​fasten it so that it cannot ​easily be ​opened: He nailed the ​boxshut. infml To nail someone is to ​catch someone in a ​dishonest or ​illegalact: We ​finally nailed the ​guysdumpinggarbage in the ​park.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of nail from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "nail" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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nailverb [T]

uk   us   /neɪl/ informal
to prove that someone is guilty of doing something: Identifying and nailing ​insiderdealers in the ​creditmarkets is a difficult ​task.
to do something successfully: He nailed the ​interview and was ​offered the ​jobright there.

nailnoun

uk   us   /neɪl/
on the nail UK informal at exactly the ​righttime: Some ​creditcards are ​offeringloyaltybonuses to ​customers who pay on the nail .
(Definition of nail from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Traducciones de “nail”
en coreano 못, 손톱…
en árabe مِسْمار, ظِفْر…
in Malaysian kuku, paku…
en francés ongle, clou…
en ruso гвоздь, ноготь…
en chino (tradicionál) 金屬, 釘,釘子…
en italiano chiodo, unghia…
en turco çivi, tırnak…
en polaco gwóźdź, paznokieć…
en español uña, clavo…
in Vietnamese móng, cái đinh…
en portugués prego, unha…
in Thai เล็บ, ตะปู…
en alemán der Nagel, nagel…
en catalán clau, ungla…
en japonés くぎ, (手足の)つめ…
en chino (simplificado) 金属, 钉,钉子…
in Indonesian kuku, paku…
Más sobre la pronunciación de nail
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“nail” in Business English

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