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Significado de “number” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "number" - Diccionario Inglés

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numbernoun

uk   /ˈnʌm.bər/  us   /ˈnʌm.bɚ/
  • number noun (SYMBOL)

A1 [C] (a ​sign or ​symbolrepresenting) a ​unit that ​formspart of the ​system of ​counting and ​calculating: 25, 300, and a ​billion are all numbers. She's very good with numbers (= good at ​adding, ​subtracting, etc.).
A1 [C] (written abbreviation no.) a number that is used to ​mark a ​particularexample of something: They ​live at number 34 Orchard Street. Please write ​yourcreditcard number on this ​form. What's ​ourflight number?
A1 [C] (written abbreviation no.) a ​phone number: I gave him my number.

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  • number noun (AMOUNT)

B1 [S, + sing/pl verb] an ​amount or ​total: The number ofpeoplekilled in ​trafficaccidentsfell last ​month. There has been anincreasing number ofcases of the ​disease. Asmall number ofchildren are ​educated at ​home. Alarge number ofinvitations has been ​sent. Letters of ​complaint were ​surprisingly few in number (= there were not many of them).
numbers [plural]
a number of a ​particulardescription: Small numbers ofchildren are ​educated at ​home. Large numbers ofinvitations were ​sent. Newspapers are ​produced invast numbers.
a number of things
B2 several of a ​particulartype of thing: I ​decided not to go, for a number of ​reasons.
[S, + sing/pl verb] a ​group of ​people: On the ​trip, one ofour number ​fellill.

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  • number noun (PARTICULAR THING)

[C] a ​particularcopy of a ​magazine: Do you have last week's number of the New Yorker? He's got all the back numbers (= ​previouscopies) of the ​magazine.
[C] informal a ​piece of ​clothing, ​especially a ​dress, that you ​admire: She was ​wearing a ​stylish Dior number.
[C] US slang a ​person with a ​particularcharacteristic: He's a ​realsexy number, don't you ​think?
[C] a ​shorttune or ​song: Sing one of those ​romantic numbers.
[C usually singular] mainly US informal something that is often said: He ​tried the ​usual/that ​old number about how his ​wife didn't ​understand him.

numberverb

uk   /ˈnʌm.bər/  us   /ˈnʌm.bɚ/
  • number verb (WRITE SYMBOL)

C1 [T] to give something a number in a ​series and usually to write this number on it: All the ​folders have been ​carefully numbered and ​filed away. Number the ​pages from one to ten.
  • number verb (AMOUNT)

C2 [L only + noun] If ​people or things number a ​particularamount, there are this many of them: After the ​hurricane the ​homeless numbered over 200,000.
(Definition of number from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "number" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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numbernoun

  • number noun (SYMBOL)

 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/ [C] (plural nos.) (abbreviation no.) a ​unit or ​itssymbol that ​formspart of a ​system of ​counting and ​calculating, and that ​represents an ​amount or ​position in a ​series: You can write numbers in words, such as six, seven, and eight, or with ​symbols, such as 6, 7, and 8.
 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/ [C] (plural nos.) (abbreviation no.) A number is also a ​specific set of ​symbols in a ​particularorder that ​represent someone or something: Please write down ​yourSocialSecurity number.
 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/ [C] (plural nos.) (abbreviation no.) A number can also be a ​position in a ​series: We’re up to 10 – who has the next number?
  • number noun (AMOUNT)

 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/ [C/U] an ​amount or ​total: [C] A ​large number of ​tickets were ​soldalmostimmediately. [C] Large numbers of ​people (= A lot of ​people)crowded the ​streets. [U] Quite a number of (= Many)cases of the ​flu have been ​reported already.
 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/ [C/U] A number of things is several of them: [U] There were a number of ​causes for the ​accident.
 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/ [C/U] Any number of things is a lot of them: [U] He’d already ​heard any number of ​excuses.
  • number noun (GRAMMAR)

grammar /ˈnʌm·bər/ [U] the ​forms of words, esp. ​nouns, ​pronouns, and ​verbs, that show whether they are ​singular or ​plural
  • number noun (SONG)

 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/ [C] a ​song, ​dance, or other ​part in a ​performance: The last number she ​sang was a ​beautiful, ​slowballad.

numberverb

 us   /ˈnʌm·bər/
  • number verb (GIVE A NUMBER)

[T] to give a different number to each of two or more things, esp. in a ​particularorder: The ​softwareautomatically numbers the ​footnotes.
  • number verb (TOTAL)

[L] to be (a ​total): The ​crowd numbered over 100,000.
(Definition of number from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "number" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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numbernoun

uk   us   /ˈnʌmbər/ ( abbreviation No.)
[C] a set of numbers that ​marks a particular ​person or thing as ​separate from others of the same ​type: account/invoice/order number Include your ​account number and the ​name of the ​fund in which you want to ​invest.contact/telephone/mobile number Please ​leave a ​contact number. a creditcard/​registration/​identification number
[C] an ​amount of ​people or things: the number of sth The number of ​employees taking ​legalaction over ​work-related disease is ​increasing.a growing/increasing/declining number Regulators are seeing a ​growing number of ​stockfraudsdirected at ​smallinvestors.the maximum/minimum/total number The ​total number of ​people in ​employment has ​increased by more than 234,000 (16.1%). a large/​record number a small/​limited number
a number of things/reasons/people, etc.
several things, reasons, ​people, etc.: There are a number of ​factorscurrentlyinfluencing stock-price fluctuations.
numbers [plural]
FINANCE the ​information in a company's ​accounts that ​shows its ​financialresults and ​position: Citigroup described the supermarket's numbers as ​strong and ​solid.
used to ​talk about how many ​people are involved in something: customer/passenger/staff numbers Passenger numbers ​increased 11.3% in the ​period.
make the numbers
to ​achieve the expected ​results, ​expressed in numbers: The ​companyculturedroveemployees to make the numbers without much ​concern for how they did it.
run the numbers
FINANCE to ​examine the details of a particular ​financialsituation, usually in ​order to make a decision about it: She ​ran the numbers on her ​mortgage and ​realized that refinancing was the ​right thing to do.
Compare

numberverb

uk   us   /ˈnʌmbər/
[T] to give something a number in a ​series: Documents ​filed under the ​Act must be numbered.
[I or T] if ​people or things number 100, 1 million, etc., there are that number of them: At its ​peak, the ​workforce involved in ​building the new ​airportterminal numbered 50,000.number in the hundreds/thousands/millions, etc. Their fan ​base numbers in the tens of millions ​worldwide.
(Definition of number from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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