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Significado de “pass” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "pass" - Diccionario Inglés

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passverb

uk   /pɑːs/  us   /pæs/

pass verb (GO PAST)

B1 [I or T] to go past something or someone or ​move in ​relation to it, him, or her: I passed him on the ​stairs this ​morning. You should only pass a ​slowervehicle if it is ​safe to do so. If you pass a ​supermarket, could you get me some ​milk? I was just passing by (= going past the ​place where you are), so I ​thought I'd ​drop in for a ​chat. A ​momentarylook of ​anxiety passed across his ​face. A ​cloud passed over the ​sun. [T] to go past a ​particularpoint in ​time: Don't ​buygoods that have passed ​their sell-by ​date.C2 [T] to go past something by being ​greater in ​amount or ​degree: The company's ​turnover is ​expected to pass the $10 million mark by the end of this ​year.C2 [I] If you say a ​state or ​feeling will pass, you ​mean it will ​disappear: Don't ​worry, his ​depression is only ​temporary - it'll ​soon pass.
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pass verb (SUCCEED)

A2 [I or T] to be ​successful in an ​exam, ​course, etc.: Guess what? I've passed my ​drivingtest! The ​exam is so hard that only five ​percent of all ​applicants pass.
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pass verb (GIVE)

B1 [T] to give something to someone: Could you pass the ​saltplease? I ​asked if I could ​see the ​letter, so she passed it to me ​reluctantly. [+ two objects] Gerald passed me the ​note./Gerald passed the ​note to me. Genes are the ​means by which ​parents' ​characteristics are passed on totheirchildren.C2 [I or T] In ​sports, if you pass the ​ball, you ​kick, ​throw, or ​hit it to someone in ​yourteam. [T] If you pass ​money, you give someone ​false or ​stolenmoney without ​telling them: [+ two objects] I haven't ​trusted him since he passed me a ​forged $100 ​bill. She was ​arrested for passing ​stolencheques.
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pass verb (TIME)

B1 [I] When ​time passes, it goes past: Time ​seems to pass (by) so ​slowly when you're ​bored. I was a little ​worried about the ​party, but the ​evening passed without any ​greatdisasters.B2 [T] If you pass a ​period of ​time, you do something to ​stop yourself being ​bored during that ​period: The ​visitors pass ​theirdaysswimming, ​windsurfing, and ​playingvolleyball.
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pass verb (APPROVE)

B2 [T] (of an ​officialgroup of ​people) to give ​approval to something, ​especially by ​voting to make it ​law: The ​government passed a ​law to ​restrict the ​sale of ​guns. The ​foodsupplement had been passed assafe for ​humanconsumption.
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pass verb (JUDGE)

pass judgment, comment, etc. to ​express a ​judgment or ​opinion about something, ​especially someone else's ​behaviour: As a ​convictedcriminal, he's in no ​position to pass ​judgment (on the ​rest of us).pass sentence to say ​officially, as a ​judge, what a criminal's ​officialpunishment will be

pass verb (EXCRETE)

[T] formal to ​removewaste from the ​body: to pass ​urinepass blood formal to have ​blood in ​yoururine or faeces (= ​solidwaste): If you pass ​blood, you should go and ​seeyourdoctor.

pass verb (NOT PLAY)

[I] to ​choose not to ​play in a ​part of a ​game or not to ​answer a ​question in a quiz

pass verb (CHANGE)

[I usually + adv/prep] to ​change from one ​state to another: Wax passes fromsolid toliquid when you ​heat it.

passnoun

uk   /pɑːs/  us   /pæs/

pass noun (EXAM RESULT)

B2 [C] UK a ​successfulresult in an ​exam: Jon Hill ​achieved two ​grade A passes at A-level. [C] US a ​successfulresult in a ​course or ​exam for which the ​student will not be given a ​mark: I got a pass in my Literature ​course.
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pass noun (BALL)

C2 [C] a ​movement of the ​ball from one ​player to another ​member of the same ​team in a ​teamsport

pass noun (DOCUMENT)

B1 [C] an ​officialdocument or ​ticketshowing that you have the ​right to go ​somewhere or use a ​particularform of ​transport: a ​bus pass a ​boarding pass My ​guest pass ​allows me to use the club's ​facilitiesfree of ​charge. [C] mainly US a ​document that ​allows a ​student to ​leave a ​class for a ​particularreason: She had a pass to go to the ​library.
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pass noun (PATH)

[C] a ​path or ​road between or over ​mountains: a ​mountain pass

pass noun (BAD SITUATION)

[S] a ​difficult or ​unpleasantcondition: If I'd been ​aware things had reached such a pass, I'd have told the ​police.UK It's come to a ​pretty pass (= it's a ​badsituation) when you can't ​even have a few ​quietdrinks with some ​friends.

pass noun (SEXUAL ACTION)

make a pass at sb informal to ​speak to or ​touch someone in a way that ​shows you would like to ​start a ​sexualrelationship with them
(Definition of pass from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "pass" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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passverb

 us   /pæs/

pass verb (GO PAST)

[I/T] to go past or move beyond something or someone: [T] A ​car passed us doing 70 ​milesperhour. [I] I was just passing by and ​stopped to say ​hello.

pass verb (GO THROUGH)

[I/T] to ​cause something to go around, ​across, through, etc., something ​else, or to be positioned in such a way: [T] Pass the ​wire through the ​slot and ​pull it out from the other ​side. [I always + adv/prep] The ​causeway passes ​across the ​bay and ​takes you to the ​mainland.

pass verb (GIVE)

[I/T] to give something to someone: [T] Please pass the ​bread. [I/T] In ​teamsportsplayed with a ​ball, if you pass, you ​throw, ​kick, or ​hit the ​ball to someone on ​yourteam.

pass verb (DO WELL)

[I/T] to be ​successful in a ​test, ​exam, or ​course, or to ​judge someone as having been ​successful in it: [T] The ​professor said that if I passed the ​finalexam, she’ll pass me.

pass verb (TIME)

[I/T] to go past or through a ​period of ​time: [I] The ​hours passed ​quickly.

pass verb (APPROVE)

[I/T] to ​approve or be ​approved by a ​group having ​authority, esp. by ​voting: [T] The ​bill passed both ​houses of ​Congress and was ​signed by the ​president. [I] The ​bill passed ​unanimously.

pass verb (NOT DO)

[I] to ​choose not to do, have, take ​part in, or take a ​turn at something: I ​think I’ll pass on going to the ​movies.

pass verb (BE ACCEPTED)

[I] to be ​accepted as being something that you are not, esp. something ​better or more ​attractive: Marion ​looks so ​young she could pass for 30. Do this ​jacket and ​skirtmatch well enough to pass as a ​suit?
passing
adjective [not gradable]  us   /ˈpæs·ɪŋ/

passnoun [C]

 us   /pæs/

pass noun [C] (DOCUMENT)

an ​officialdocument or ​ticketshowing that you have the ​right to go ​somewhere or do something: We ​bought three-day passes to the ​amusementpark. The ​children get ​bus passes to ​travel to and from ​school.

pass noun [C] (DOING WELL)

a ​mark given to show that a ​student has ​successfullycompleted a ​course or an ​exam

pass noun [C] (GIVING)

the ​act of giving or ​sending the ​ball to another ​player on ​your own ​team: The ​receiverdropped the pass.
(Definition of pass from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "pass" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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passverb

uk   /pɑːs/  us   /pæs/
[I or T] to go past something or someone or ​move in relation to it or them: I was just passing by, so I ​thought I'd ​drop in for a ​chat.
[T] to go past a particular ​point in ​time: Don't ​buygoods which have passed their sell-by ​date.
[T] to go past something by being greater in ​amount or degree: As the world's largest ​conveniencestorechain, it just passed McDonald's in the ​number of ​worldwideoutlets.pass the $1m/€100m/£10bn, etc. mark The ​company is expected to pass the $10m ​mark by the end of this ​year.
[I] if you say a ​situation or ​feeling will pass, you ​mean it will disappear: We're in a difficult ​economicsituation, but it will pass eventually.
[I or T] to be ​successful in an ​examination, ​course, etc.: All ​interviewees need to pass a basic math and ​literacytest.
[T] to give something to someone: Could you pass me that ​file, please?
[T] if you pass ​money, you give someone ​false or ​stolenmoney without telling them: Police have warned ​businesses that someone is passing ​stolenchecks in the ​area.
[I] when ​time passes, it goes past: A lot of ​time has passed since we ​opened our first ​store.
[T] if you pass ​time, you ​spendtime doing something: With more ​people passing ​time in the ​terminal, ​airportofficialstry to make them comfortable.
[T] to give ​approval to something, especially by ​voting to make it ​law: California passed a ​law in September to ​cutcarbon dioxide ​emissions by 25%.
[I] to choose not to answer a ​question: pass on sth Asked whether he ​thought the FA should ​intervene, he ​replied diplomatically: 'Can I pass on this one?'
[I] to ​change from one ​condition to another: pass from sth to sth As new ​electronicgadgetsfall in ​price, they pass from a ​nicheproduct to a ​massproduct.

passnoun [C]

uk   /pɑːs/  us   /pæs/
an ​officialdocument or ​ticket which ​shows that you have the ​right to go somewhere or use a particular ​form of ​transport: a parking/security/visitor's pass Sign in at ​reception and they will give you a visitor's pass.an annual/season/three-day pass Frequent visitors of ​national forests can ​savemoney by ​buying an ​annual pass.
a ​successfulresult in an ​examination: This ​candidate got 4 ​grade A passes at A-level.
(Definition of pass from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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