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Significado de “pocket” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "pocket" - Diccionario Inglés

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pocketnoun [C]

uk   /ˈpɒk.ɪt/  us   /ˈpɑː.kɪt/

pocket noun [C] (BAG)

A2 a ​smallbag for ​carrying things in, made of ​cloth and ​sewn into the inside or onto the ​outside of a ​piece of ​clothing: a ​jacket/​trouser/​coat pocket a ​hip/​breast pocket She ​thrust her ​handsdeep in/into her pockets. He took some ​coins from/out of his pocket.B1 a ​container, usually made of ​cloth, that is ​sewn into or onto a ​bag or ​attached to a ​seat or ​door in a ​vehicle: Sarah put her ​maps in the ​outside pocket of her ​rucksack. The ​safetyinstructions are in the pocket of the ​seat in ​front of you. one of several ​holes around the ​edge of a billiard or snookertable, into which ​balls are ​hitC2 informal the ​amount of ​money that someone has for ​spending: You need deep pockets (= a lot of ​money) if you're ​involved in a ​longlawsuit. I ​paid for my ​ticket out of my own pocket (= with my own ​money), but I can ​claim the ​cost of it back from my ​employer.
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pocket noun [C] (GROUP/AREA)

a ​group, ​area, or ​mass of something that is ​separate and different from what ​surrounds it: Among the ​staff there are some pockets ofresistance to the ​plannedchanges (= some ​smallgroups of them are ​opposed). The ​pilot said that we were going to ​encounter a pocket ofturbulence (= an ​area of ​violentlymovingair).

pocketverb [T]

uk   /ˈpɒk.ɪt/  us   /ˈpɑː.kɪt/
to put something into ​your pocket: He ​carefully pocketed his ​change. to ​hit a billiard or snookerball into a pocket: Davis pocketed the ​black to ​win the ​game. to take something for yourself, ​especiallydishonestly: I'll ​tell them I ​sold it for £25, not £25, then I can pocket the ​rest.

pocketadjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈpɒk.ɪt/  us   /ˈpɑː.kɪt/
used to ​describe something that is ​small enough to put in ​your pocket, or that you ​regularlycarry in ​your pocket: a pocket ​dictionary a pocket ​diary a pocket ​calculator smaller than ​usual: a pocket ​battleship
(Definition of pocket from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "pocket" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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pocketnoun [C]

 us   /ˈpɑk·ɪt/

pocket noun [C] (BAG)

a ​smallbag, usually made of ​cloth, ​sewn on the inside or ​outside of a ​piece of ​clothing and used to ​holdsmallobjects: coat/​pants/​shirt pockets She took her ​keys out of her pocket. I ​paid for my ​ticket out of my own pocket (= with my own ​money). A pocket is also a ​smallcontainer that is ​part of or ​attached to something ​else: The ​map is in the pocket on the ​cardoor. In the ​game of pool , the pockets are the ​holes around the ​edge of the ​table into which the ​balls are ​hit.

pocket noun [C] (PART)

a ​smallpart of something ​larger that is ​consideredseparate because of a ​particularquality: It ​remained a pocket of ​poverty within a ​generallyaffluentarea.
pocketful
noun [C]  us   /ˈpɑk·ɪtˌfʊl/
a pocketful of ​coins

pocketadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ˈpɑk·ɪt/

pocket adjective [not gradable] (BAG)

small enough to be ​kept in a pocket: a pocket ​diary a pocket ​watch

pocketverb [T]

 us   /ˈpɑk·ɪt/

pocket verb [T] (BAG)

to put something in ​your pocket, or (​fig.) to take ​money esp. when it has been ​obtainedunfairly or ​illegally: He pocketed his ​change. fig. Some ​sold nonexistent ​land and pocketed all the ​cash.
(Definition of pocket from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "pocket" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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pocketnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈpɒkɪt/
FINANCE used to ​talk about the ​amount of ​money that a ​person or an ​organization has for ​spending: come from/out of sb's pocket The ​cost of ​fixingflaws comes out of the contractor's pocket.put cash/money into sb's pockets This is significant because it puts more ​cash into people's pockets. He will have to dig ​deep into the taxpayer's pocket to ​finance the ​requiredinvestment in the country's ​railinfrastructure. This is beyond the pockets of most ​homeowners.
a ​group, ​area, or ​part of something which is ​separate and different from what surrounds it: Outside of ​manufacturing, there are pockets of our ​economy that continue to ​perform well.
be in the pocket of sb/sth to be under the ​control of a ​person, an ​organization, etc.: At the heart of the ​scandal is the suggestion that supposedly ​independentbrokers are in the pocket of the ​insurers which are ​theoreticallycompeting.
deep pockets a lot of ​money: In this ​market, you need to have ​deep pockets. The two ​companies will ​survive any ​downturn because of their large ​marketshares, ​strongtechnology, and ​deep pockets.
from/out of your own pocket(s) using your own ​personalmoney, and not the ​money of a ​company or an ​organization: Managers have ​donated €80,000 from their own pockets to ​help the ​companyfund its ​campaign.
hit sb/sth in the pocket to make a ​person or an ​organizationpay for something: The ​shareholders have been ​hit in the pocket.
line your/sb's pockets to get ​richer or make someone ​richer, especially by ​actingunfairly or by being dishonest: He was not ​accused of lining his own pockets.
out of pocket UK FINANCE having less ​money than you had previously or should have, as a ​result of something such as a ​businessdeal: The ​company is out of pocket to the ​tune of $18 million. The ​limit on his ​pension would be irrespective of how fast ​prices are ​rising, ​meaning he could be out of pocket in ​realterms.leave sb out of pocket Charities fear that an ​interruption to the ​lottery could ​leave them out of pocket.
See also
US INSURANCE if you ​pay out of pocket for ​medicaltreatment, you ​pay for the ​cost of ​treatment that is not ​included in your ​insurance: According to the ​report, families are ​paying about $1,500 more out of pocket than six ​years ago
put your hand in your pocket to ​spendmoney or give ​money to someone: The ​landlord insisted that the ​tenant should put his ​hand in his pocket and ​pay for the ​repairs.

pocketverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈpɒkɪt/
to ​earn or ​win an ​amount of ​money: The ​company now pockets £44 million ​profit a ​year. Even ​relativelyjuniortraders were pocketing huge ​bonuses.
to take ​money for yourself in a dishonest way, especially when you are ​responsible for looking after it: The two men were ​indicted for pocketing tens of millions of ​dollars.
pocket the difference to ​keep the ​extramoney made from a ​financialdeal, often in a dishonest way: They ​purchased homes with ​loans above the ​askingprice so they could pocket the difference.

pocketadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /ˈpɒkɪt/
relating to something that is ​small enough to be put or ​carried in your pocket: a pocket ​computer/​pager/PC a pocket ​calculator/​diary/​organiser
(Definition of pocket from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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