push Significado en Diccionario Cambridge Inglés
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Significado de “push” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "push" - Diccionario Inglés

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pushverb

uk   us   /pʊʃ/

push verb (USE PRESSURE)

A2 [I or T] to use ​physicalpressure or ​force, ​especially with ​yourhands, in ​order to ​move something into a different ​position, usually one that is ​further away from you: Can you ​help me ​move this ​table? You push and I'll ​pull. The ​windowsticks - you have to push hard to ​open it. He ​helped me push my ​car off the ​road. He pushed his ​plate away from him, ​refusing to ​eat any more. She pushed her ​hair out of her ​eyes. I ​tried to push the ​dooropen but it was ​stuck. It isn't ​clear whether he ​fell off the ​balcony or was pushed. To ​turn the ​television on, you just push (= ​press) this ​button. He pushed the ​money into my ​hand (= ​forcefully gave me the ​money), saying, "Please take it." We pushed the ​boat off from (= ​moved the ​boatforward by using ​pressure against) the ​riverbank.
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push verb (MOVE WITH FORCE)

B1 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​moveforcefully, ​especially in ​order to ​cause someone or something that is in ​your way to ​move, so that you can go through or past them: Stop pushing - ​waityourturn. She pushed through the ​crowd. I'm ​sorry - I didn't ​mean to push in ​front of you. The ​celebrities pushed past the ​waitingjournalists, ​refusing to ​speak to them. In the ​finallap of the ​race, he ​managed to push (= ​movestrongly) ahead. Weeds push (= ​growstrongly) up through the ​cracks in the ​concrete. They pushed (= ​forcefully made)their way to the ​front. [I usually + adv/prep] When an ​army pushes in a ​particulardirection, it ​movesforward in that ​direction: The ​invadingtroops have pushed ​further into the ​north of the ​country.
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push verb (PERSUADE WITH FORCE)

B2 [T] to ​forcefullypersuade or ​direct someone to do or ​achieve something: Her ​parents pushed her intomarrying him. The ​schoolmanages to push most of ​itsstudents throughtheirexams. If we ​want an ​answer from them by ​Friday, I ​think we're going to have to push them for it. [+ to infinitive] We had to push them toacceptourterms, but they ​finallyagreed to the ​deal. You'll never be ​successful if you don't push ​yourself (= ​work)harder.
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push verb (ADVERTISE)

[T] informal to ​advertise something ​repeatedly in ​order to ​increaseitssales: They're really pushing ​their new ​car.
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push verb (SELL DRUGS)

[T] informal to ​sellillegaldrugs: He was ​arrested for pushing ​drugs toschoolchildren.

push verb (INTERNET)

[T] specialized internet & telecoms to ​sendinformation over the internet without ​receiving a ​request for it first
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pushnoun

uk   us   /pʊʃ/

push noun (PRESSURE)

B1 [C] the ​act of ​moving someone or something by ​pressing them with ​yourhands or ​body: Get on the ​swing and I'll give you a push. I gave the ​door a hard push, but it still wouldn't ​open. I can ​order all these ​goods at the push of a ​button (= by pushing a ​button).
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  • They had to give the ​car a push to ​start it.
  • Go on - give it a good hard push!
  • You can't ​expect to get everything you need at the push of a ​button.

push noun (STRONG MOVEMENT)

[C] a ​strongmovement towards a ​place: The ​army is ​continuingits push (= ​advance) towards the ​capital.

push noun (ATTEMPT)

[C] a ​determinedattempt to get an ​advantage over other ​companies in ​business: The ​companyplans to make a ​big push into the ​Europeanmarket next ​spring. [+ to infinitive] The ​hotel is making a ​major push toattractcustomers.

push noun (ENCOURAGEMENT)

C1 [S] encouragement to make someone do something: My ​mother had always ​wanted to ​learn how to ​paint - she just ​needed a ​gentle push.

push noun (ADVERTISING)

[S] a lot of ​advertising: This ​film is ​unlikely to ​attractlargeaudiencesunless it gets/it is given a ​big push in the ​media.
(Definition of push from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "push" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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pushverb

 us   /pʊʃ/

push verb (USE FORCE AGAINST)

[I/T] to put a ​continuingforce against something to ​cause it to move ​forward or away from you: [I] We should be ​able to move this ​table if we both push together. [T] She pushed her ​plate away. [I/T] To push is also to ​cause something to move or ​change in a ​stateddirection: [M] Rising ​demandtends to push ​prices up.

push verb (MOVE FORCEFULLY)

[I/T] to move ​forcefully through a ​group of ​people or things: [I] Stop pushing and ​waityourturn! [T always + adv/prep] Rescuers pushed ​their way through the ​rubble to ​reachsurvivors.

push verb (PERSUADE FORCEFULLY)

[T] to ​try to ​persuade someone ​forcefully to do or ​accept something: She’s pushing me for an ​answer. The ​administration is pushing ​its new ​tradeagreement with Mexico. infml This ​restaurant is pushing ​itscarrotsoup today (= ​trying to get ​people to ​order it).

pushnoun [C]

 us   /pʊʃ/

push noun [C] (FORCEFUL MOVEMENT)

a ​force put or ​pressed against something that ​causes it to move ​forward or away from you: She gave her ​daughter a push on the ​swing.

push noun [C] (FORCEFUL PERSUASION)

an ​attempt to ​persuade someone ​forcefully to do or ​accept something: [+ to infinitive] Florida is making a ​major push to ​attract more tourists.
(Definition of push from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "push" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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pushverb

uk   us   /pʊʃ/
[I or T] to ​press a ​switch or something similar: When I push the '​call' ​button, my ​phone makes a strange ​noise.
[T] to ​force someone to ​move away from a ​place: Small ​farmers are saying they have been pushed off their ​land by the ​supermarket.
[T] to ​try hard to make someone do what you want, especially when they do not really want to do it: She ​feels the ​salesrep pushed her into ​buying the ​vehicle.push sb for sth If we want an answer from them by Friday, I ​think we're going to have to push them for it.push sb to do sth We had to push them to ​accept our ​terms, but they ​finallyagreed to the ​deal.
push yourself to use a lot of ​effort and ​determination to ​achieve something: You'll never be ​successful if you don't push yourself.
[T] informal MARKETING to ​try hard to make ​peoplebuy something, especially by ​advertising it repeatedly: We need to really push this ​product in the spring, ​ready for the summer ​season.
be pushed for time to not have much ​time to do something: If you're pushed for ​time, we could ​meet tomorrow instead.

pushnoun

uk   us   /pʊʃ/
[S] MARKETING an ​effort to make something more ​successful, for ​example by ​advertising it a lot or giving it ​extramoney: The ​event is ​part of a ​major push by the ​hotel to ​attractcustomers.get a push This film is unlikely to ​attract large ​audiences unless it gets a ​big push in the ​media.give sth a push This is an ​economy that ​needs the Fed to ​step in and give it a push.
[C] a ​determinedeffort to get an ​advantage over other ​companies in ​business: make a push into sth The ​companyplans to make a ​big push into the ​Europeanmarket next spring.
give sb the push UK informal WORKPLACE, HR to tell someone that they no ​longer have a ​job, especially because they have done something wrong: I have no ​idea why they gave me the push.
get the push UK informal WORKPLACE, HR to be told that you no ​longer have a ​job, especially because you have done something wrong: Sounds like he hasn't come to ​terms with getting the push.
(Definition of push from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“push” in Business English

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a school that is financially supported by a particular religious group, usually for children from that religion

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