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Significado de “raise” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "raise" - Diccionario Inglés

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raiseverb [T]

uk   us   /reɪz/
  • raise verb [T] (LIFT)

B1 to ​lift something to a ​higherposition: Would all those in ​favourplease raise ​their hands? He raised the ​window and ​leaned out. Mary Quant was the first ​fashiondesigner to raise ​hemlines.

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  • raise verb [T] (INCREASE)

B1 to ​cause something to ​increase or ​becomebigger, ​better, ​higher, etc.: The ​governmentplan to raise taxes. I had to raise my voice (= ​speak more ​loudly) to make myself ​heard over the ​noise. The ​inspector said that standards at the ​school had to be raised. Our little ​chat has raised my spirits (= made me ​feelhappier).

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  • raise verb [T] (EXIST)

B2 to ​cause to ​exist: Her ​answers raised doubts/​fears/​suspicions in my ​mind. This ​discussion has raised many ​important issues/​problems. The ​announcement raised a cheer/​laugh. I ​want to raise (= ​talk about) two ​problems/​questions with you. I ​want to ​start my own ​business if I can raise (= ​obtain) the money/​cash/​capital/​funds.formal The ​chapel was raised (= ​built) as a ​memorial to her ​son.

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  • raise verb [T] (DEVELOP)

B2 to take ​care of a ​person, or an ​animal or ​plant, until they are ​completelygrown: Her ​parentsdied when she was a ​baby and she was raised by her ​grandparents. The ​lambs had to be raised by ​hand (= ​fedmilk by ​people) when ​theirmotherdied. The ​farmer raises (= ​breeds)chickens and ​pigs. The ​soil around here isn't good enough for raising (= ​growing)crops.

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  • raise verb [T] (CARD GAMES)

If you raise another ​player in a ​game of ​cards, you ​risk more ​money than that ​player has ​risked: I'll raise you. [+ two objects] I'll raise you $50.
  • raise verb [T] (COMMUNICATE)

to ​communicate with someone, ​especially by ​phone or ​radio: I've been ​trying to raise Jack/Tokyo all ​day.

raisenoun [C]

uk   us   /reɪz/ US (UK rise)
an ​increase in the ​amount that you are ​paid for the ​work you do : She ​asked the ​boss for a raise.
(Definition of raise from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "raise" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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raiseverb [T]

 us   /reɪz/
  • raise verb [T] (LIFT)

to ​cause something to be ​lifted up or ​becomehigher: He raised the ​windowshades. Stephie raised her ​hand to ​ask the ​teacher a ​question.
  • raise verb [T] (BECOME BIGGER)

to ​cause something to ​becomebigger or ​stronger; ​increase: I had to raise my ​voice to be ​heard over the ​noise in the ​classroom. There are no ​plans to raise ​taxes, the ​president said. I don’t ​want to raise ​yourhopes too much, but I ​think the ​worst of the ​flooding is over.
  • raise verb [T] (DEVELOP)

to take ​care of ​children or ​younganimals until ​completelygrown: They raised a ​family and now ​want to ​enjoytheirretirement.
  • raise verb [T] (BRING ABOUT)

to ​bring something to ​yourattention; ​cause to be ​noticed: This raises a ​number of ​importantissues. To raise ​money is to ​succeed in getting it: I ​want to ​start my own ​business if I can raise enough ​money.
Idioms

raisenoun [C]

 us   /reɪz/
  • raise noun [C] (SOMETHING BECOMING BIGGER)

an ​increase in the ​amountmoney you ​earn: She ​asked her ​boss for a raise.
(Definition of raise from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "raise" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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raiseverb [T]

uk   us   /reɪz/
to ​increase the ​amount, ​level, or ​quality of something: The Bank of England was expected to raise the ​cost of ​borrowing after ​higher than expected ​inflationfigures.raise salaries/prices/taxes There is ​increasingpressure on ​exporters to raise ​prices in ​foreignmarkets.raise awareness/standards/quality The new ​government is ​pledging to raise ​standards in ​education.
FINANCE to ​manage to get ​money to ​invest in a ​business, ​project, ​property, etc.: raise capital/funds/money We will raise ​funds for ​reconstruction by disposing of ​assets. The ​shareissue in the coffee ​companyaims to raise €5m from ​investors eager to ​invest in ​ethicalconcerns. raise a ​loan/​mortgage
to mention something that you are worried or not sure about so that it can be ​examined and dealt with: raise concerns/doubts/fears The ​company announced a ​package of ​reforms to ​addressconcerns raised by ​shareholders. raise ​issues/​objections/​questions
ACCOUNTING to prepare an ​invoice: The ​exporter raises an ​invoice in the usual way on the ​overseasbuyer.
COMMUNICATIONS to make or ​arrange a ​phonecall, especially to discuss ​technicalhelp, ​business, etc.: If you have a ​technicalfault, you can raise a ​call using the ​in-housesystem.

raisenoun [C]

uk   us   /reɪz/ US (UK rise)
HR an ​increase in ​salary or ​wages: A 2% raise for each ​employee would ​add $28 million to the ​overallbudget.
(Definition of raise from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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