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Significado de “relative” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "relative" - Diccionario Inglés

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relativenoun [C]

uk   /ˈrel.ə.tɪv/  us   /-t̬ɪv/
B1 a ​member of ​yourfamily: I don't have many blood relatives (= ​peoplerelated to me by ​birthrather than by ​marriage). All her close/​distant relatives came to the ​wedding.

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relativeadjective

uk   /ˈrel.ə.tɪv/  us   /-t̬ɪv/ formal
  • relative adjective (COMPARING)

C1 being ​judged or ​measured in ​comparison with something ​else: We ​weighed up the relative ​advantages of ​driving there or going by ​train. true to a ​particulardegree when ​compared with other things: Since I got a ​job, I've been ​living in relative ​comfort (= more ​comfort than before).

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  • relative adjective (CONNECTED)

relative to C2 If something is relative to something ​else, it ​changesaccording to the ​speed or ​level of the other thing: The ​amount of ​petrol a ​car uses is relative to ​itsspeed. If something is relative to a ​particularsubject, it is ​connected with it: Are these ​documents relative to the ​discussion?
(Definition of relative from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "relative" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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relativeadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ˈrel·ə·t̬ɪv/
as ​judged or ​measured in ​comparison with something ​else: We ​considered the relative ​merits of ​flying to Washington or taking the ​train. Relative to (= Considering) birthweight, the newborns were doing well.
relatively
adverb [not gradable]  us   /ˈrel·ə·t̬ɪv·li/
The ​stereo was relatively ​inexpensive.

relativenoun [C]

 us   /ˈrel·ə·t̬ɪv/
  • relative noun [C] (FAMILY)

a ​member of ​yourfamily: All her relatives came to the ​wedding.
(Definition of relative from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "relative" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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relativeadjective

uk   us   /ˈrelətɪv/
having a particular characteristic or ​value compared to other things of a similar ​type: The ​Chancellor of the Exchequer ​talked about the UK's relativegrowth performance compared with "​core" ​Europe. relative ​importance/​strength/​sizerelative cost/price International borrowers have seen the relative ​cost of their ​loansrise slightly in the past six months.a relative newcomer/unknown The ​firm is a relative newcomer to the ​world of ​futurestrading.
relative to sth compared to something else: Official ​figures probably ​understate Europe's ​growth relative to America. Pay in many ​white-collarjobs has been ​stagnating relative to ​inflation.relative to earnings/income/sales Motoring ​costs are ​forecast to ​increaseeven further over the next ten ​years relative to ​income.relative to sb's competitors/peers Steps taken now to ​addressclimatechange can ​improve a company's ​competitiveposition relative to its ​peers.
(Definition of relative from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Traducciones de “relative”
en árabe قَريب…
en coreano 친척…
en portugués parente…
en catalán parent, -a…
en japonés 親戚, 身内…
en chino (simplificado) 亲戚, 亲属…
en turco akraba…
en ruso родственник…
en chino (tradicionál) 親戚, 親屬…
en italiano parente…
en polaco krewn-y/a…
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“relative” in Business English

Palabra del día

procession

a line of people who are all walking or travelling in the same direction, especially in a formal way as part of a religious ceremony or public celebration

Palabra del día

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

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farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

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