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Significado de “road” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "road" - Diccionario Inglés

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roadnoun [C or U]

uk   /rəʊd/  us   /roʊd/
A1 a ​long, hard ​surfacebuilt for ​vehicles to ​travel along: We ​live on a ​busy/​quiet road. Be ​careful when you ​cross a main road. There's a ​coffeeshop on the other ​side of the road. The road from here to Adelaide ​runs/goes through some ​beautifulcountryside. All roads into/out of the ​town were ​blocked by the ​snow. I ​hateflying so I go ​everywhere by road or ​rail. I ​live in/on Mill Road. My ​address is 82 Mill Road. Is this the Belfast road (= the road that goes to Belfast)? Most road accidents are ​caused by ​peopledriving too ​fast.
on the road
If a ​vehicle is on the road, it is ​working as it should and can be ​legally used: My ​car was in the ​garage for a ​week, but it's now back on the road.
C1 When you are on the road, you are ​driving or ​travelling, usually over a ​longdistance: After two ​days on the road, they ​reached the ​coast.
If a ​group of ​actors or ​musicians are on the road, they are ​travelling to different ​places to ​perform: Most ​rockgroupsspend two or three ​months a ​year on the road.

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(Definition of road from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "road" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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roadnoun [C/U]

 us   /roʊd/
a ​route for ​traveling between ​places by ​vehicle, esp. one that has been ​specially surfaced and made ​flat: [C] a ​gravel/​dirt/​paved road
Road ( (abbreviation Rd.)) is often used in the ​names of roads: [U] 82 Mill Road
(Definition of road from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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