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Significado de “screen” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "screen" - Diccionario Inglés

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screennoun [C]

uk   /skriːn/  us   /skriːn/
  • screen noun [C] (PICTURE)

A2 a ​flatsurface in a ​cinema, on a ​television, or as ​part of a ​computer, on which ​pictures or words are ​shown: Our ​television has a 19-inch screen. Coming to ​your screens (= ​cinemas)shortly, "The Adventures of Robin Hood". Her ​ambition is to write for the screen (= for ​television and ​films). Write the ​letter on the ​computer, then you can make ​changeseasily on screen.
the small screen
television: He's made several ​films for the ​small screen.
the big screen
cinema: So this is ​your first ​appearance on the ​big screen?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • screen noun [C] (SEPARATING)

a ​verticalstructure that is used to ​separate one ​area from another, ​especially to ​hide something or to ​protect you from something ​unpleasant or ​dangerous: The ​nursepulled a screen around the ​bed so that the ​doctor could ​examine the ​patient in ​private. A screen oftrees at the ​bottom of the ​gardenhid the ​uglyfactorywalls.
mainly US an ​activity that is not ​dangerous or ​illegal but is used to ​hide something that is: That café's just a screen fortheircriminalactivities.

screenverb [T]

uk   /skriːn/  us   /skriːn/
  • screen verb [T] (EXAMINE)

to ​test or ​examine someone or something to ​discover if there is anything ​wrong with him, her, or it: Women over 50 should be screened forbreastcancer. Completely ​unsuitablecandidates were screened out (= ​tested and ​refused) at the first ​interview.
screen your calls
to ​delayyourdecision to ​answer the ​phone until you ​know who is ​calling you: I always screen my ​calls while I'm ​eatingdinner.
  • screen verb [T] (PICTURE)

to show or ​broadcast a ​film or ​televisionprogramme: The ​programme was not screened on British ​television.
  • screen verb [T] (PROTECT)

to ​protect or ​hide: She ​raised her ​hand to screen her ​eyes from the ​brightlight.
mainly US to ​protect someone by taking the ​blame yourself: The ​husband says he's the ​murderer but we ​think it was his ​wife - he's just screening her.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of screen from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "screen" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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screennoun [C]

 us   /skrin/
  • screen noun [C] (PICTURE)

a ​flatsurface in a ​theater, on a ​television, or on a ​computersystem on which ​pictures or words are ​shown: I ​spend most of the ​dayworking in ​front of a ​computer screen.
The screen sometimes ​means the ​movies: Her ​ambition is to write for the screen. a screen ​actor/​actress
  • screen noun [C] (THING THAT SEPARATES)

something that ​blocks you from ​seeing what is behind it, esp. a ​stiffpiece of ​material that you can ​stand up like ​part of a ​wall and move around: Jennifer has a ​beautiful screen ​decorated with Japanese ​art.
A screen is also a ​stiff, ​wirenet that has very ​smallholes and is ​fixed within a ​frame, put in ​windows esp. in ​warmweather to ​let in ​air and ​keepinsects out.

screenverb [T]

 us   /skrin/
  • screen verb [T] (EXAMINE)

to ​test or ​examine someone or something to ​discover if there is anything ​wrong with the ​person or thing: Airport ​securitystaff have to screen and ​check millions of ​bags a ​year. The ​company president’s ​secretary screens all his ​calls (= ​answers them first to ​prevent some from getting through).
  • screen verb [T] (SHOW MOVIE)

to show or ​broadcast a ​movie or ​televisionprogram: His new ​movie got ​ravereviews when it was screened at Cannes.
  • screen verb [T] (BLOCK)

to ​block, ​protect, or ​hide someone or something with a screen: She ​raised her ​hand to screen her ​eyes from the ​sun.
(Definition of screen from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "screen" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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screennoun [C]

uk   us   /skriːn/
a ​flat surface on a ​television or ​computer, or in a cinema, on which pictures or words are shown: a computer screen a television/cinema screen come up on/appear on a screenscroll up/down a screen Scroll down to the ​bottom of the screen.

screenverb [T]

uk   us   /skriːn/
HR to ​check that someone is suitable and able to do a ​job by getting ​information about their previous ​jobs, ​personalactivities, etc.: screen sb for sth The ​short-listedcandidates were screened for the ​job.
PRODUCTION to ​test or ​examine something to discover if there is anything wrong with it: screen sth for sth The ​carparts were screened for ​defects.
COMMUNICATIONS to show something on ​television or at a cinema: The 30-second ad was screened last night.
(Definition of screen from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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