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Significado de “sell” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "sell" - Diccionario Inglés

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sellverb

uk   /sel/ us   /sel/ sold, sold
  • sell verb (MONEY)

A2 [I or T] to give something to someone else in return for money: [+ two objects] I sold him my car/I sold my car to him for $600. We'll be selling the tickets at/for £50 each. The stall sells drinks and snacks.
A2 [I or T] to be bought in the way or quantities that are mentioned; to be sold at the price mentioned : These baskets sell well (= a lot of them are bought). Their last album sold over a hundred thousand copies. How much does the phone sell for?
  • sell verb (PERSUADE)

C2 [T] to persuade someone that an idea or plan is a good one and likely to be successful: My boss is very old-fashioned and I'm having a lot of trouble selling the idea of working at home occasionally. The filmmakers sold me on the idea that my book would work on the screen. [+ two objects] The chance of greater access to European markets would help sell the president the plan/sell the plan to the president. In an interview, you have to sell yourself to the employer.
(Definition of sell from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "sell" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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sellverb [I/T]

us   /sel/ past tense and past participle sold /soʊld/
  • sell verb [I/T] (EXCHANGE FOR MONEY)

to give a thing or perform a service in exchange for money: [T] The children sold lemonade. [I] These baskets sell well (= people buy a lot of them).
  • sell verb [I/T] (PERSUADE)

to persuade someone to accept an idea or plan, or to cause something to be accepted: [T] That is a plan we can easily sell to the school board.
(Definition of sell from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "sell" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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sellverb

uk   /sel/ us   sold, sold
[I or T] COMMERCE, FINANCE to give something to someone else in return for money: sell securities/shares/stock sell a car/company/house The 43% owner of the company indicated that it was ready to sell.sell sth to sb/sth The partners plan to sell 40% of the company to investors.sell sb sth We are going to sell him our car.sell to sb/sth The site could be built on if the owners decided to sell to private developers.sell sth at $10/$100, etc. It raised $180 million Monday by selling 7.2 million shares at $25 apiece.sell sth at a loss/markup/profit The business was sold at an enormous profit.sell sth for $10/$100, etc. How much did you sell your house for?
[I or T] COMMERCE to have something available for people to buy: sell goods/products/services On either bank of the river are specialist shops selling designer clothes, books, music and art. Its products are sold in 150 countries. We sell directly via a contact sales force. sell online/over the internet
[I or T] COMMERCE, FINANCE to be bought in the quantities or the way specified: sell fast/well The watches are selling well through the group's retail outlets.sell at $10/$100, etc. The stock is currently selling at 11 times earnings estimates.sell for $10/$100, etc. The games console will sell for $349. The company had problems with overstocking and products that didn't sell. The magazine is now selling 225,000 copies a week.
[I or T] MARKETING to make people want to buy something: Price and delivery are only two elements of the marketing mix that sells products. It's a cliche of advertising to say that "sex sells".
[T] to persuade someone that an idea or plan is a good one, and likely to be successful: He is trying to sell an idea for a TV comedy.sell sth to sb The government sold spending cuts to the public as a way to get the economy growing again.
sell yourself
to persuade people that you have the right qualities or abilities for a particular job or in a particular situation: The phone interview is your one chance to sell yourself.
sell like hot cakes informal
to be bought quickly and in large numbers: With-profits bonds have sold like hot cakes to older people looking for a low-risk, high return for their money.

sellnoun [C, usually singular]

uk   /sel/ us   MARKETING
an act of selling or trying to sell a product or service: a difficult/hard/tough sell In spite of continuing drought conditions, artificial grass remains a hard sell. Fear of unemployment make mortgage protection an easy sell.
Compare
an act of trying to persuade someone that something is a good idea: a hard/difficult/tough sell Tax breaks for developers to build more-expensive housing would be a tough sell.
[C] also sell rating FINANCE, STOCK MARKET advice to sell shares in a particular company from a broker: The broker SG Securities is moving its rating to a sell. While Merrill has a neutral recommendation, we believe the shares are a sell.
(Definition of sell from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“sell” in British English

“sell” in American English

“sell” in Business English

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