Significado de “spiral” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "spiral" - Diccionario Inglés

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spiralnoun [ C ]

uk /ˈspaɪə.rəl/ us /ˈspaɪr.əl/

spiralverb [ I usually + adv/prep ]

uk /ˈspaɪə.rəl/ us /ˈspaɪr.əl/ -ll- or US usually -l-

to move in a spiral:

With one wing damaged, the model airplane spiralled downwards.

If costs, prices, etc. spiral, they increase faster and faster:

Spiralling costs have squeezed profits.
spiral downwards

(of prices, etc.) to become less, at a faster and faster rate

If a situation spirals, it quickly gets worse in a way that becomes more and more difficult to control:

Violence in the country is threatening to spiral out of control.
He spiralled into a drug addiction that cost him his life.

spiraladjective [ before noun ]

uk /ˈspaɪə.rəl/ us /ˈspaɪr.əl/

shaped in a series of curves, each one above or wider than the one before:

a spiral staircase
a spiral galaxy

(Definition of “spiral” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "spiral" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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spiralnoun [ C ]

us /ˈspɑɪ·rəl/

a shape of a continuous, curving line that forms circles around a center point:

A corkscrew is made in a spiral.
fig. Roy was bitter about the downward spiral of his life (= it was becoming continuously worse).
spiral
adjective [ not gradable ] us /ˈspɑɪ·rəl/

spiralverb [ I ]

us /ˈspɑɪ·rəl/ -l-, -ll-

to move in a spiral:

The engine quit, and my beautiful model airplane spiraled downward.
High winds spiraled around the storm center.

(Definition of “spiral” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "spiral" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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spiralnoun [ C ]

uk /ˈspaɪərəl/ us

a situation in which prices, levels, rates, etc. go down, or in which a situation gets worse and is difficult to control because one bad event causes another:

a spiral of sth The world's two biggest economies are caught in a spiral of borrowing.
This year's downward spiral of house prices has depressed the market.
My former colleagues have been stuck in a spiral that continues to say, the only way we can continue our profit margins is to cut good journalism, and that is to me a death spiral.

spiralverb [ I, usually + adv/prep ]

uk /ˈspaɪərəl/ us UK -ll-, US -l-

also spiral up/upward(s) if costs, prices, etc. spiral, they increase quickly:

Costs spiral, and the patient is subjected to tests they don't need.
Inflation began to spiral upward.
spiral (from sth) to sth The country's foreign debt spiralled from $840 million to $2.6 billion.
spiral downwards

if costs, prices, etc. spiral downwards, they go down quickly:

Stock prices have spiralled downwards for the past two weeks.
spiral out of control

if a situation spirals out of control, it becomes impossible to control because one bad event causes another:

The project spiraled out of control, running $300 million over budget.
There is a great deal of evidence that internet gambling is spiralling rapidly out of control.
spiralling
US spiraling

spiralling fuel costs

(Definition of “spiral” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)