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Significado de “start” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "start" - Diccionario Inglés

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startverb

uk   /stɑːt/  us   /stɑːrt/

start verb (BEGIN)

A1 [I or T] to ​begin doing something: When do you start ​yourcourse/​your new ​job? We'll be starting (the ​session) at six o'clock. Can you start (= ​begin a new ​job) on ​Monday? [+ -ing verb] They started ​building the ​house in ​January. [+ to infinitive] I'd just started to write a ​letter when the ​phonerang.B2 [I or T] (also start up) If a ​business or other ​organization starts, or if someone starts one, it is ​created and starts to ​operate: She started her own ​softwarecompany. A lot of new ​restaurants have started up in the ​region.B1 [I or T] to ​begin to ​happen or to make something ​begin to ​happen: A new ​series about ​wildlife has started on ​Mondaynights. Police ​believe the ​fire was started by arsonists.A1 [I or T] to ​begin a set of ​activities with the thing or ​personmentioned: The ​speaker started with a ​description of her ​journey to ​China. Give me ​youranswers one by one, starting with Lucy. You could start byweeding the flowerbeds. He started his ​workinglife as an ​engineer but ​laterbecame a ​teacher. [I] informal to ​begin to ​complain or be ​annoying in some way: Don't start with me - we're not going and that's that!informal "It would ​help if Richard did some ​work." "Oh, don't get me started on Richard!"get started to ​begin: When can we get started?start a family to have ​your first ​childstart something to ​begin an ​argument or a ​fight: You could ​tell the ​guywanted to start something, so we just ​walked away.start work to ​begin being ​employed: He started ​work at 16 in a ​bakery.to start with B2 at the ​beginning, or as the first of several things: We only ​knew two ​people in Montreal to start with, but we ​soon made ​friends. To start with, we need ​bettercomputers - then we need more ​training.
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start verb (FIRST POINT)

[I usually + adv/prep] to ​begin at one ​point and then ​move to another, in ​distance or ​range: The ​run starts at/from the ​entrance to the ​park. We'll need to start (off/out) early because the ​journeytakes six ​hours. Tell me what ​happened - start at the ​beginning. Ticket ​prices start at/from €80 and go up to €500.

start verb (MOVE SUDDENLY)

[I] to ​moveyourbodysuddenly because something has ​surprised or ​frightened you: He started at the ​sound of the ​phone.

start verb (WORK)

B2 [I or T] (also start up) to (​cause to) ​begin to ​work or ​operate: I'm having ​trouble starting the ​car. The ​engine won't start.

startnoun

uk   /stɑːt/  us   /stɑːrt/

start noun (BEGINNING)

B1 [S] the ​beginning of something: We were ​doubtful about the product's ​usefulness from the start. They ​announced the start of a new ​commercialventure. The ​weather was good at the start (= in the first ​part) of the ​week. The ​event got off to a ​shaky/​poor start with the ​stagelightsfailing in the first few ​minutes.C2 [C] the ​act of ​beginning to do something: We need to make a start on (​preparing) the ​brochure next ​week.from start to finish C1 including all of something, from the ​beginning to the end: The ​wholeparty was a ​disaster from start to ​finish.for a start C1 UK first, or as the first in a set of things: We'll take ​names and ​phonenumbers for a start, then ​later on we can get more ​details. used when giving a first ​example of something: This ​book is ​better than her last one. For a start, it's ​shorter.
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start noun (ADVANTAGE)

C2 [S] an ​advantage that you have over someone ​else when you ​begin something: We gave the ​youngestchildren a five-second start (= in a ​race).

start noun (SUDDEN MOVEMENT)

[S] a ​suddenmovement of the ​body that you make when something has ​surprised or ​frightened you: He ​woke with a start. She gave a start as I ​entered.
(Definition of start from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "start" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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startverb

 us   /stɑrt/

start verb (BEGIN)

[I/T] to ​begin to do something or go ​somewhere, or to ​begin or ​happen: [T] When do you start ​your new ​job? [I] We started with nothing when we got ​married. [I] Classes start next ​month. [I] Work starts at 9:00 a.m. [I] Ticket ​prices start at $20 (= these are the ​cheapestprices). [T] I just started this ​book (= ​began to ​read it). [I] We’ll start out with Lucy (= She will be the first). [I/T] infml If you ​tell someone not to start, you are ​warning that ​person not to ​begincomplaining or ​annoying you: [I] Don’t start – I said no!

start verb (CAUSE)

[T] to ​cause something to be or ​happen: His ​mother started the ​craftmarket at the ​communitycenter. You’ve been starting ​trouble all ​morning.

start verb (MOVE SUDDENLY)

[I] to move ​yourbodysuddenly because something has ​surprised you: He started when the ​carbackfired.

start verb (OPERATE)

[I/T] to ​cause something to ​operate, or to ​begin to ​work or ​operate: [T] Annie went ​outside to start the ​car. [I] I ​heard a ​lawnmower start.

startnoun

 us   /stɑrt/

start noun (BEGINNING)

[C/U] the ​time where something ​begins, or the ​act of ​beginning: [U] We were ​worried from the start. [U] They ​announced the start of the ​race. [C] The ​play got off to a ​bad start.

start noun (SUDDEN MOVEMENT)

[U] a ​suddenmovement of ​yourbody because something has ​surprised you: He ​woke with a start when the ​alarmsounded.
(Definition of start from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "start" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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startverb

uk   us   /stɑːt/
[I or T] HR, WORKPLACE to begin to ​work in a ​job: Can you start on Monday? I recently started a new ​job and I'm enjoying it very much so far. Entry-level ​employees start at ​lowsalaries.
start work WORKPLACE to begin to be ​employed for the first ​time: He started ​work at 16 in a ​local baker's. to begin your day at ​work: I start ​work at 8.30 in the morning.
[I or T] to begin an ​activity or a set of ​activities: He started the ​talk with a ​review of the past year's ​achievements.start by doing sth She started by thanking us all for ​attending.
[I or T] (also start up) if a ​business or other ​organization starts, or if someone starts one, it is ​created and starts to ​operate: start a business/company She started her own ​softwarecompany last ​year. The ​economicmodel of ​small, farmer-owned ethanol ​plants got the ​industry started.
See also
[I ] to begin at one ​level and then ​move to another: prices start at/from sth Ticket ​prices start at €20 and go up to €100.
[I or T] (also start off, also start out) to begin in a particular way and then ​change later: He started his ​workinglife as an ​engineer, but later became a teacher.start as sth The ​company started as a ​snowremovalbusiness with one ​truck, and ​grew from there.start with sth He started with nothing and was a ​millionaire by the ​time he was 35.
[I or T] if a ​machine or ​vehicle starts, or you start it, it begins to ​work or ​operate: I started the ​computer and ​checked my ​mail.

startnoun

uk   us   /stɑːt/
[C, usually singular] the beginning of something: get off to a bad/good/slow start The FTSE 100 got off to another good start and ​climbedsteadily through the morning The ​shares have ​fallen from 418p at the start of the ​year to 121p today. Accessibility is something you must ​think about right from the start when you're choosing your ​venue. Johnson ​led the ​project from start to ​finish.
[S] the ​act of beginning to do something: make a start on sth/doing sth Europeanfunding has been obtained to ​enable us to make a start on the ​project.
[C, usually plural] a ​business or ​job that has just begun, or a ​person who has just started a new ​job: Construction ​spending, ​driven by starts of new ​factories and highways, ​rose a larger-than-expected 0.9%. They have been ​providingreliabledata on ​small business starts and ​closures since 2003. All new starts are expected to ​sign the ​workplaceagreement.
[C, usually singular] an ​opportunity to begin something and start to be ​successful at it: She got her start with the ​company as an ​accountant, ​auditing their ​books.
[S] →  head start
a fresh start a ​situation in which you start something again in a completely new and different way after you have been unsuccessful: The ​program will ​alloweconomicallystrappedtaxpayers to make a fresh start.
(Definition of start from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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