stuff Significado en Diccionario Cambridge Inglés Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Significado de “stuff” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "stuff" - Diccionario Inglés

See all translations

stuffnoun

uk   /stʌf/  us   /stʌf/
  • stuff noun (THING(S))

B1 [U] informal a substance, especially when you do not know or say exactly what it is: There's sticky stuff all over the chair. What's this black stuff? He drinks gallons of tea - he loves the stuff.
[U] informal things that someone says or does, when you are referring to them in a general way without saying exactly what they are: All that stuff she has been saying about Lee is just not true. We did some really interesting stuff today. I have to go now - I've got stuff to do. I've read all her books - I really like her stuff.
[U] informal someone's possessions or things that they take somewhere with them: We'll have to carry all our camping stuff. Do you want help bringing your stuff in from the van? We can't move to a smaller place - we've got too much stuff.
and stuff
used to refer to more things of a similar kind to ones you have mentioned, when you do not say exactly what they are: This is the drawer where I keep paper and envelopes and stuff. The classrooms all have computers and interactive whiteboards and stuff. I was embarrassed because he wanted to talk about love and stuff.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • stuff noun (QUALITY)

[U] US someone's skill or great abilities: Avery had great stuff, total command of all three of his pitches. An interview is a chance to show your stuff.

stuffverb

uk   /stʌf/  us   /stʌf/
  • stuff verb (FILL)

[T] to completely fill a container with something: Stuff the pillow and then sew up the final seam. Under her bed, they found a bag stuffed with money.
C2 [T] informal to push something into a small space, often quickly or in a careless way: This suitcase is absolutely full - I can't stuff another thing into it.
[T] to fill the body of a dead animal with special material so that it looks as if it is still alive
[T] mainly UK offensive (of a man) to have sex with a woman

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of stuff from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "stuff" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

See all translations

stuffnoun [U]

 us   /stʌf/
  • stuff noun [U] (SUBSTANCE)

a substance or material: What’s the black stuff on the rug? This stuff tastes good.
  • stuff noun [U] (THINGS)

a group of different things, activities, or matters: We helped him move his stuff to the new apartment. I’ve got a lot of stuff to do this weekend. They’d heard all this stuff before.

stuffverb [T]

 us   /stʌf/
  • stuff verb [T] (FILL)

to fill the inside of something: I can’t stuff another thing into this suitcase.
To stuff a turkey, or other meat or vegetable, is to fill it with other food before cooking it.
If you stuff yourself, you eat a large amount of food: The kids stuffed themselves with snacks.
(Definition of stuff from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de stuff
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

Aprende más 

Palabra del día

spaceship

(especially in stories) a vehicle used for travel in space

Palabra del día

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Aprende más