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Significado de “sucker” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "sucker" - Diccionario Inglés

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suckernoun

uk   /ˈsʌk.ər/  us   /ˈsʌk.ɚ/
  • sucker noun (STICKING DEVICE)

[C] something that helps an animal or object to stick to a surface: The leech has a sucker at each end of its body.
UK informal for suction cup
  • sucker noun (PLANT PART)

[C] specialized biology a new growth on an existing plant that develops under the ground from the root or the main stem, or from the stem below a graft (= part where a new plant has been joined on)
  • sucker noun (FOOLISH PERSON)

[C] informal disapproving a person who believes everything they are told and is therefore easy to deceive: You didn't actually believe him when he said he had a yacht, did you? Oh, Annie, you sucker!
be a sucker for sth informal
to like something so much that you cannot refuse it or judge its real value: I have to confess I'm a sucker for musicals.
(Definition of sucker from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "sucker" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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suckernoun [C]

 us   /ˈsʌk·ər/
  • sucker noun [C] (FOOLISH PERSON)

infml a person who believes everything you say and is therefore easy to deceive
infml If you are a sucker for something, you like it so much that you cannot refuse it: Josie’s a sucker for burnt almond ice cream.
  • sucker noun [C] (THING)

infml used to refer to a thing that is surprising or that is causing trouble: My car won’t start again, and hopefully between the two of us we can figure out how to make that sucker work.
  • sucker noun [C] (CANDY)

a lollipop
(Definition of sucker from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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