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Significado de “take” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "take" - Diccionario Inglés

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takeverb

uk   /teɪk/ us   /teɪk/ took, taken
  • take verb (REMOVE)

B1 [T] to remove something, especially without permission: Has anything been taken (= stolen)? Here's your pen - I took it by mistake. All her possessions had been taken from her.
B2 [T] to subtract a number (= remove it from another number): If you take 4 (away) from 12 you get 8.
See also

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  • take verb (MOVE)

A1 [T] to move something or someone from one place to another: The weather forecast said rain, so take your umbrella (with you) when you go out. The suitcases were taken to San Antonio by mistake. Take the book up/down to the third floor of the library. [+ two objects] I suggested that he should take her some chocolates/take some chocolates to her (= bring them to her as a present).

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  • take verb (ACCEPT)

B1 [T] to accept or have: Do they take credit cards here? Do you take milk in your coffee? This container will take (= has room for) six litres.UK Which newspaper do you take (= regularly buy)? He continually abuses her, and she just sits there and takes it. If you think I'm going to take that lying down (= accept it without complaining), you're very much mistaken. I take the/your point (= accept the argument), but I still don't think you should have gone.
[T] used when you want to mention something as a particular example of what you are talking about: I've been very busy recently. Take last week, I had meetings every night after work, except Friday.
take to be/take for sth
If you take someone or something to be something, or if you take someone or something for something, you accept or believe that they are that thing: [+ to infinitive] These creatures are generally taken to be descended from primitive fishes. I could have taken him for (= believed that he was) your brother. I'm not going to forge his signature for you! What do you take me for? (= You should not believe I could do a thing like that.)
can't take sth
B2 to not be able to deal with an unpleasant situation: I can't take it any more. I'm leaving.
take it or leave it
accept or refuse the offer completely: That's my final offer - you can take it or leave it.

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  • take verb (HOLD)

B1 [T] to move in order to hold something in the hand(s): Can you take this bag while I open the door? He took my arm and led me outside. Take an egg and break it into the bowl. He took hold of the plant's root and pulled.

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  • take verb (GO WITH)

A1 [T] to go somewhere with someone, often paying for that person or being responsible for them: We're taking the kids to the zoo on Saturday. [+ to infinitive] I took my elderly parents to look at some new houses. [+ -ing verb] Will you take me swimming tomorrow?
[T] to show someone how to get to somewhere by going there with them: Let me take you to your room.
[T] to go to a social event with someone: Who's taking you to the dance?

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  • take verb (TRANSPORT)

A2 [T] to travel somewhere by using a particular form of transport or a particular vehicle, route, etc.: I always take the train - it's less hassle than a car. She took the 10.30 flight to Edinburgh. If you take the road on the left, you'll come to the post office.

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  • We took a bus to Mexico City.
  • From Heathrow, you can take a taxi.
  • I took the 6.30 train to Manchester.
  • Why don't you take the train to Paris?
  • We took a flight to Denver.
  • take verb (NEED)

B2 [T] to need: Parachuting takes a lot of nerve. Transitive verbs take a direct object. [+ -ing verb] His story took some believing (= was difficult to believe).
B1 to wear a particular size of clothes or shoes: What size shoes do you take?
A2 [L only + noun] If something takes a particular time, that period is needed in order to complete it: The cooking process only takes ten minutes. [+ to infinitive] How long does this paint take to dry? [+ obj + noun ] It took us all day to drive home.
not take long
A2 to act or happen over a short period of time: I'm just going to the shops - I won't take long.
take time
to need a long time: Broken bones always take time to heal.

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  • take verb (MEASURE)

C2 to measure something: Nurses took my temperature and blood pressure.
  • take verb (ACT)

B1 [T] to do or perform: Shelley is taking (= studying) economics at university.UK The Archbishop took our service of thanksgiving.UK Mr Marshall takes us for (= teaches us) physics.
B1 [T] used with many nouns to make a verb phrase that is equal in meaning to the related verb: I think we'll take a break (= we'll stop for a break) there. If you're tired you should take a rest (= you should rest). I always like to take a walk (= to walk) after lunch.

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  • take verb (REACTION)

B2 [T] to have or come to have a particular feeling or opinion: He doesn't take any interest in his children. Don't take any notice of the cameras. She takes offence too easily. They took pity on the stray cat and fed it. I take the view that fuel should be heavily taxed to reduce road use.
take sb by surprise also take sb unawares
to surprise someone: The sudden noise took her by surprise.

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  • take verb (MONEY)

mainly UK US usually take in [T] to receive money from sales or as payment for entrance to an event: The show took an astonishing $100,000 in its first week.
See also

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  • take verb (CATCH)

B2 [T] to get possession of something or someone: Rebels ambushed the train and took several prisoners. The Liberals need just 200 more votes to take the seat from Labour. With these wins, the Democrats have now taken the House back from the Republicans. Centre-left parties look set to take power. Adam, I'd like you to take control of the aircraft now.

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  • take verb (WRITE)

B1 [T] to write: I hope you're all taking notes.

takenoun

uk   /teɪk/ us   /teɪk/
(Definition of take from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "take" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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takeverb [T]

us   /teɪk/ past tense took /tʊk/
  • take verb [T] (MOVE)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to move something or someone from one place to another: Please, take me with you! It may rain, so take your umbrella. The suitcases were taken to Madrid by mistake. I thought I’d take her some chocolates. I take home about $200 a week.
  • take verb [T] (REMOVE)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to remove something: Here’s your pen – I took it by mistake. A radio was taken from the car.
take someone’s life
To take someone’s life is to kill someone: The fire took her life.
  • take verb [T] (ACCEPT)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to accept something, or to receive something willingly: I tried to phone him, but he refused to take my call. Does this restaurant take credit cards? Take this medicine three times a day. I can take three more people in my car. It’s a girlsschool that has now started taking boys. Bob took a lot of criticism for his decision. I refuse to take responsibility for what’s happened.
  • take verb [T] (THINK OF)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to think of someone or understand something in a particular way; perceive: [+ to infinitive] I took him to be more honest than he really was. The police are taking the robberies very seriously. In the dim light I could have taken them for brothers. I’m not going to forge his signature! What do you take me for?
past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ Take is sometimes used to introduce an example of what you mean: It’s been really busy. Take last week – we had meetings every day.
  • take verb [T] (HOLD)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to hold something: He took my arm and led me to my seat. Can you take this bag while I open the door?
  • take verb [T] (CATCH)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to catch, win, or get possession of something: Rebels ambushed the train and took several prisoners. My roses took first prize at the flower show.
  • take verb [T] (NEED)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to have as a necessary condition; need: Parachuting takes a lot of nerve. I take a size 9 shoe. Transitive verbs take a direct object. It didn’t take much persuasion to get her to go with us. How long does this paint take to dry? Broken bones always take time to mend.
takes forever
If something takes forever, it happens very slowly: In rush-hour traffic, it takes forever to get home.
  • take verb [T] (ACT)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to do something: I’ve started taking piano lessons. The government urged both sides to take steps to end the strike.
past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ Take is used with many nouns to make a verb phrase: We can’t delay any longer – we have to take action (= to act). In the evening I like to take a walk (= to walk). If you’re tired, you need to take a nap (= to sleep).
take effect
to take effect means to start working: The medicine should take effect quite quickly.
take turns
If you take turns, you and other people do the same thing, one after the other: The mothers in our group take turns driving the children to school.
  • take verb [T] (MEASURE)

past participle taken /ˈtei·kən/ to measure something: Better take the baby’s temperature – she may have a fever.
  • take verb [T] (REACT)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to have or cause to have a particular feeling or opinion: He takes little interest in current events. She takes offense too easily.
take someone by surprise
To take someone by surprise means to do something that is completely unexpected: His sudden proposal took her totally by surprise.
  • take verb [T] (CHEAT)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ infml to cheat someone: You paid $500 for that thing? I think you got taken.
  • take verb [T] (WRITE)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to write information provided by someone or something: Take notes as you read. Journalists took down every word he said during the interview.
  • take verb [T] (PHOTOGRAPH)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to make a photograph of someone or something: We took lots of pictures of the new baby.
  • take verb [T] (TRAVEL ON)

past participle taken /ˈteɪ·kən/ to travel on something to get from one place to another: I always take the train. Take the road on the left to get to my house.

takenoun

us   /teɪk/
  • take noun (FILMING)

[C] the filming of a small part of a movie: That scene needed ten takes before they got it right.
  • take noun (MONEY)

[U] the amount of money received from an activity: The box office take has been huge for the new show.
  • take noun (OPINION)

[C] a particular feeling, opinion, or reaction: What’s your take on the new proposals for new health care?
(Definition of take from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "take" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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takeverb [T]

uk   /teɪk/ us   took, taken
also take away to subtract one number or amount from another: take sth from sth You'll need to take $2,000 from the $8,000 to allow for tax.
to remove something or someone from somewhere: take sth/sb off (sth) What are we left with after we take off our costs? I asked for her name to be taken off the list. They decided to take him off the job and assign him to another department.take sth away The police took away all of the files for investigation.
to accept or receive something: Do you take credit cards?take an order We're taking 5,000 orders a day. Top executives will take a 10% pay cut. He took a job as salesman in a local company. Are you going to take the job if you get offered it?
US also take in COMMERCE to receive money from sales or as payment for something: They took an astonishing $100,000 in their first week. The company will make money by taking 5% from each bet.
COMMERCE to buy or choose something: The good news is that they have decided to take 200 units a year. 50% of our total production is taken by just three customers.
to need something: It takes determination to succeed in a new business venture.
if something takes a particular amount of time, that time is needed in order to finish it: They estimated that the project would take about 6 months to complete.
have (got) what it takes
to have the necessary qualities or abilities to do something: Have you got what it takes to be in charge of a department? If you don't have what it takes, you're not going to last long.
take it or leave it
used when you are offering something to someone to say that you will not improve your offer: And that's our final offer. Take it or leave it.
take part (in sth)
to be involved in something with other people: Most of the board members took part in the discussions.
take stock
to think carefully about a situation or event and form an opinion about it, so that you can decide what to do: When markets touch new highs, investors need to take stock. I am currently taking stock of our position.
ACCOUNTING →  stocktake
take time
to need a lot of time: It's going to take time to get this department running smoothly again.

takenoun

uk   /teɪk/ us  
[U] FINANCE, COMMERCE money that is received from sales or as payment for something: The players now get 75% of the take. Tour operators had come to rely on the commission from insurance to increase their take. Last weekend's take was down over 50%.
be on the take disapproving informal
to accept money for helping someone to do something illegal: They vowed to punish officials on the take.
(Definition of take from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“take” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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