take Significado en Diccionario Cambridge Inglés
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Significado de “take” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "take" - Diccionario Inglés

See all translations

takeverb

uk   us   /teɪk/ (took, taken)

take verb (REMOVE)

B1 [T] to ​remove something, ​especially without ​permission: Has anything been taken (= ​stolen)? Here's ​yourpen - I took it by ​mistake. All her possessions had been taken from her.B2 [T] to subtract a ​number (= ​remove it from another ​number): If you take 4 (away) from 12 you get 8.
See also
More examples

take verb (MOVE)

A1 [T] to ​move something or someone from one ​place to another: The ​weatherforecast said ​rain, so take ​yourumbrella (with you) when you go out. The ​suitcases were taken to San Antonio by ​mistake. Take the ​book up/down to the third ​floor of the ​library. [+ two objects] I ​suggested that he should take her some ​chocolates/take some ​chocolates to her (= ​bring them to her as a ​present).
More examples

take verb (ACCEPT)

B1 [T] to ​accept or have: Do they take ​creditcards here? Do you take ​milk in ​yourcoffee? This ​container will take (= has ​room for) six ​litres.UK Which ​newspaper do you take (= ​regularlybuy)? He ​continuallyabuses her, and she just ​sits there and takes it. If you ​think I'm going to take that lying down (= ​accept it without ​complaining), you're very much ​mistaken. I take the/​yourpoint (= ​accept the ​argument), but I still don't ​think you should have gone. [T] used when you ​want to ​mention something as a ​particularexample of what you are ​talking about: I've been very ​busyrecently. Take last ​week, I had ​meetings every ​night after ​work, except ​Friday.take to be/take for sth If you take someone or something to be something, or if you take someone or something for something, you ​accept or ​believe that they are that thing: [+ to infinitive] These ​creatures are ​generally taken to be ​descended from ​primitivefishes. I could have taken him for (= ​believed that he was)yourbrother. I'm not going to ​forge his ​signature for you! What do you take me for? (= You should not ​believe I could do a thing like that.)can't take sth B2 to not be ​able to ​deal with an ​unpleasantsituation: I can't take it any more. I'm ​leaving.take it or leave it accept or ​refuse the ​offercompletely: That's my ​finaloffer - you can take it or ​leave it.
More examples

take verb (HOLD)

B1 [T] to ​move in ​order to ​hold something in the hand(s): Can you take this ​bag while I ​open the ​door? He took my ​arm and ​led me ​outside. Take an ​egg and ​break it into the ​bowl. He took hold of the plant's ​root and ​pulled.
More examples

take verb (GO WITH)

A1 [T] to go ​somewhere with someone, often ​paying for that ​person or being ​responsible for them: We're taking the ​kids to the ​zoo on ​Saturday. [+ to infinitive] I took my ​elderlyparents tolook at some new ​houses. [+ -ing verb] Will you take me swimmingtomorrow? [T] to show someone how to get to ​somewhere by going there with them: Let me take you toyourroom. [T] to go to a ​socialevent with someone: Who's taking you to the ​dance?
More examples

take verb (TRANSPORT)

A2 [T] to ​travelsomewhere by using a ​particularform of ​transport or a ​particularvehicle, ​route, etc.: I always take the ​train - it's less ​hassle than a ​car. She took the 10.30 ​flight to Edinburgh. If you take the ​road on the ​left, you'll come to the ​postoffice.
More examples
  • We took a ​bus to Mexico City.
  • From Heathrow, you can take a ​taxi.
  • I took the 6.30 ​train to Manchester.
  • Why don't you take the ​train to Paris?
  • We took a ​flight to Denver.

take verb (NEED)

B2 [T] to need: Parachuting takes a lot of ​nerve. Transitive ​verbs take a ​directobject. [+ -ing verb] His ​story took some believing (= was ​difficult to ​believe).B1 to ​wear a ​particularsize of ​clothes or ​shoes: What ​sizeshoes do you take?A2 [L only + noun] If something takes a ​particulartime, that ​period is ​needed in ​order to ​complete it: The ​cookingprocess only takes ten ​minutes. [+ to infinitive] How ​long does this ​paint take todry? [+ obj + noun ] It took us all ​day todrivehome.not take long A2 to ​act or ​happen over a ​shortperiod of ​time: I'm just going to the ​shops - I won't take ​long.take time to need a ​longtime: Broken ​bones always take ​time to ​heal.
More examples

take verb (MEASURE)

C2 to ​measure something: Nurses took my ​temperature and ​bloodpressure.

take verb (DRUG/MEDICINE)

A2 to ​swallow or use a ​medicine or ​drug, ​especially in a ​regular way: Take this ​medicine three ​times a ​day. Do you ​think she takes ​drugs?

take verb (ACT)

B1 [T] to do or ​perform: Shelley is taking (= ​studying)economics at ​university.UK The Archbishop took ​ourservice of ​thanksgiving.UK Mr Marshall takes us for (= ​teaches us)physics.B1 [T] used with many ​nouns to make a ​verb phrase that is ​equal in ​meaning to the ​relatedverb: I ​think we'll take a ​break (= we'll ​stop for a ​break) there. If you're ​tired you should take a ​rest (= you should ​rest). I always like to take a ​walk (= to ​walk) after ​lunch.
More examples

take verb (THINK ABOUT)

B2 [T] to ​think about something or someone in a ​particular way: We're taking the ​bombthreats very seriously.

take verb (UNDERSTAND)

C2 to ​understand something in a ​particular way: I was just ​teasing him, but he took it the ​wrong way. I'm not ​sure whether to take that as a ​compliment or an ​insult. She gave a ​nod, which we took to ​mean that she ​agreed.

take verb (REACTION)

B2 [T] to have or come to have a ​particularfeeling or ​opinion: He doesn't take any interest in his ​children. Don't take any notice of the ​cameras. She takes offence too ​easily. They took pity on the ​straycat and ​fed it. I take the ​view thatfuel should be ​heavilytaxed to ​reduceroad use.take sb by surprise (also take sb unawares) to ​surprise someone: The ​suddennoise took her by ​surprise.
More examples

take verb (MONEY)

mainly UK (US usually take in) [T] to ​receivemoney from ​sales or as ​payment for ​entrance to an ​event: The show took an ​astonishing $100,000 in ​its first ​week.
See also
More examples

take verb (CATCH)

B2 [T] to get ​possession of something or someone: Rebels ​ambushed the ​train and took several ​prisoners. The Liberals need just 200 more ​votes to take the ​seat fromLabour. With these ​wins, the Democrats have now taken the House back from the Republicans. Centre-left ​partieslook set to take power. Adam, I'd like you to take control of the ​aircraft now.
More examples

take verb (WRITE)

B1 [T] to write: I ​hope you're all taking ​notes.

take verb (PERFORM WELL)

[I] to ​work or ​perform as ​expected: These new ​plants haven't taken - they don't like this ​drysoil.

takenoun

uk   us   /teɪk/

take noun (MONEY)

[U] money that is ​received from ​sales or as ​payment for ​entrance to an ​event: The ​boxoffice take was ​huge for the new show.

take noun (FILM)

[C] the ​filming of a scene (= ​smallpart of a ​film): This ​sceneneeded ten takes before we ​felt it was ​right.

take noun (OPINION)

take on sth an ​opinion about something: We'd ​love to ​hearyour take on this ​issue.

take noun (VERSION)

take on sth a ​version of something that ​shows someone's ​attitude towards it: The ​restaurantoffers a new take on ​traditionalFrenchcooking.
(Definition of take from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "take" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

See all translations

takeverb [T]

 us   /teɪk/ (past tense took  /tʊk/ )

take verb [T] (MOVE)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to move something or someone from one ​place to another: Please, take me with you! It may ​rain, so take ​yourumbrella. The ​suitcases were taken to Madrid by ​mistake. I ​thought I’d take her some ​chocolates. I take ​home about $200 a ​week.

take verb [T] (REMOVE)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to ​remove something: Here’s ​yourpen – I took it by ​mistake. A ​radio was taken from the ​car.take someone’s life To take someone’s ​life is to ​kill someone: The ​fire took her ​life.

take verb [T] (ACCEPT)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to ​accept something, or to ​receive something ​willingly: I ​tried to ​phone him, but he ​refused to take my ​call. Does this ​restaurant take ​creditcards? Take this ​medicine three ​times a ​day. I can take three more ​people in my ​car. It’s a ​girls’ ​school that has now ​started taking ​boys. Bob took a lot of ​criticism for his ​decision. I ​refuse to take ​responsibility for what’s ​happened.

take verb [T] (THINK OF)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to ​think of someone or ​understand something in a ​particular way; perceive : [+ to infinitive] I took him to be more ​honest than he really was. The ​police are taking the robberies very seriously. In the ​dimlight I could have taken them for ​brothers. I’m not going to ​forge his ​signature! What do you take me for? (past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) Take is sometimes used to ​introduce an ​example of what you ​mean: It’s been really ​busy. Take last ​week – we had ​meetings every ​day.

take verb [T] (HOLD)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to ​hold something: He took my ​arm and ​led me to my ​seat. Can you take this ​bag while I ​open the ​door?

take verb [T] (CATCH)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to ​catch, ​win, or get ​possession of something: Rebels ambushed the ​train and took several ​prisoners. My ​roses took first ​prize at the ​flower show.

take verb [T] (NEED)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to have as a ​necessarycondition; need: Parachuting takes a lot of ​nerve. I take a ​size 9 ​shoe. Transitive ​verbs take a ​directobject. It didn’t take much ​persuasion to get her to go with us. How ​long does this ​paint take to ​dry? Broken ​bones always take ​time to ​mend.takes forever If something takes ​forever, it ​happens very ​slowly: In rush-hour ​traffic, it takes ​forever to get ​home.

take verb [T] (ACT)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to do something: I’ve ​started taking ​pianolessons. The ​governmenturged both ​sides to take ​steps to end the ​strike. (past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) Take is used with many ​nouns to make a ​verb phrase: We can’t ​delay any ​longer – we have to take ​action (= to ​act). In the ​evening I like to take a ​walk (= to ​walk). If you’re ​tired, you need to take a ​nap (= to ​sleep).take effect to take ​effectmeans to ​startworking: The ​medicine should take ​effectquitequickly.take turns If you take ​turns, you and other ​people do the same thing, one after the other: The ​mothers in ​ourgroup take ​turnsdriving the ​children to ​school.

take verb [T] (MEASURE)

(past participle taken  /ˈtei·kən/ ) to ​measure something: Better take the baby’s ​temperature – she may have a ​fever.

take verb [T] (REACT)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to have or ​cause to have a ​particularfeeling or ​opinion: He takes little ​interest in ​currentevents. She takes ​offense too ​easily.take someone by surprise To take someone by ​surprisemeans to do something that is ​completelyunexpected: His ​suddenproposal took her ​totally by ​surprise.

take verb [T] (CHEAT)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) infml to ​cheat someone: You ​paid $500 for that thing? I ​think you got taken.

take verb [T] (WRITE)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to write ​informationprovided by someone or something: Take ​notes as you ​read. Journalists took down every word he said during the ​interview.

take verb [T] (PHOTOGRAPH)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to make a ​photograph of someone or something: We took ​lots of ​pictures of the new ​baby.

take verb [T] (TRAVEL ON)

(past participle taken  /ˈteɪ·kən/ ) to ​travel on something to get from one ​place to another: I always take the ​train. Take the ​road on the ​left to get to my ​house.

takenoun

 us   /teɪk/

take noun (FILMING)

[C] the ​filming of a ​smallpart of a ​movie: That ​sceneneeded ten takes before they got it ​right.

take noun (MONEY)

[U] the ​amount of ​moneyreceived from an ​activity: The ​boxoffice take has been ​huge for the new show.

take noun (OPINION)

[C] a ​particularfeeling, ​opinion, or ​reaction: What’s ​your take on the new ​proposals for new ​healthcare?
(Definition of take from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "take" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

See all translations

takeverb [T]

uk   us   /teɪk/ (took, taken)
(also take away) to ​subtract one ​number or ​amount from another: take sth from sth You'll need to take $2,000 from the $8,000 to ​allow for ​tax.
to ​remove something or someone from somewhere: take sth/sb off (sth) What are we ​left with after we take off our ​costs? I ​asked for her ​name to be taken off the ​list. They decided to take him off the ​job and ​assign him to another ​department.take sth away The ​police took away all of the ​files for ​investigation.
to ​accept or receive something: Do you take ​creditcards?take an order We're taking 5,000 ​orders a day. Top ​executives will take a 10% ​paycut. He took a ​job as ​salesman in a ​localcompany. Are you going to take the ​job if you get ​offered it?
(US also take in) COMMERCE to receive ​money from ​sales or as ​payment for something: They took an astonishing $100,000 in their first week. The ​company will make ​money by taking 5% from each ​bet.
COMMERCE to ​buy or choose something: The good ​news is that they have decided to take 200 ​units a ​year. 50% of our ​totalproduction is taken by just three ​customers.
to need something: It takes ​determination to ​succeed in a new ​businessventure.
if something takes a particular ​amount of ​time, that ​time is needed in ​order to ​finish it: They ​estimated that the ​project would take about 6 months to complete.
have (got) what it takes to have the necessary ​qualities or ​abilities to do something: Have you got what it takes to be in ​charge of a ​department? If you don't have what it takes, you're not going to last ​long.
take it or leave it used when you are ​offering something to someone to say that you will not ​improve your ​offer: And that's our ​finaloffer. Take it or ​leave it.
take part (in sth) to be involved in something with other ​people: Most of the ​boardmembers took ​part in the discussions.
take stock to ​think carefully about a ​situation or ​event and ​form an ​opinion about it, so that you can decide what to do: When ​marketstouch new ​highs, ​investors need to take ​stock. I am ​currently taking ​stock of our ​position. ACCOUNTING →  stocktake
take time to need a lot of ​time: It's going to take ​time to get this ​departmentrunning smoothly again.

takenoun

uk   us   /teɪk/
[U] FINANCE, COMMERCE money that is received from ​sales or as ​payment for something: The ​players now get 75% of the take. Tour ​operators had come to rely on the ​commission from ​insurance to ​increase their take. Last weekend's take was down over 50%.
be on the take disapproving informal to ​acceptmoney for helping someone to do something ​illegal: They vowed to punish ​officials on the take.
(Definition of take from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de take
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“take” in Business English

Tesauro SMART: Murder & attempted murder

“take”: synonyms and related words:

También encontrarás palabras, frases y sinónimos relacionados con los temas:

Palabra del día

chestnut

a large tree with leaves divided into five parts and large round nuts that can be eaten

Palabra del día