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Significado de “toll” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "toll" - Diccionario Inglés

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tollnoun

uk   /təʊl/  us   /toʊl/
  • toll noun (CHARGE)

C1 [C] a ​smallamount of ​money that you have to ​pay to use a ​road, ​cross a ​bridge, etc.: Tolls are now ​collectedelectronically on most ​motorways.
[C] US the ​money a long-distancephonecallcosts: Is Bayonne a toll call (= a more ​expensivephonecall) from New York?

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  • toll noun (SUFFERING)

C2 [U] suffering, ​deaths, or ​damage: Independent ​sources say that the death toll from the ​earthquakeruns into thousands.

tollverb [I or T]

uk   /təʊl/  us   /toʊl/
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "toll" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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tollnoun

 us   /toʊl/
  • toll noun (MONEY)

[C] an ​amount of ​money that you have to ​pay to ​travel along some ​mainroads, to cross ​bridges, etc., or to make ​telephonecalls over ​longdistances: They’re ​raising the ​bridge toll to $5.00. The ​number you ​dialed is a toll ​call – ​pleasedeposit an ​additional fifty ​cents.
  • toll noun (SUFFERING)

[U] a high ​degree of ​suffering or ​damage: In ​addition to the ​physicaldestruction caused by the ​flooding, the ​emotional toll on ​itsvictims was ​immense.

tollverb [I/T]

 us   /toʊl/
(of a ​largebell) to ​ringslowly and ​repeatedly, or to ​cause a ​largebell to ​ring in this way: [I] The ​townhallbell tolled at ​noon.
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "toll" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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tollnoun

uk   us   /təʊl/
[C] TRANSPORT an ​amount of ​money that you have to ​pay to use a road or ​bridge: Motorists in the ​regionpaid more than $11.6 million in tolls last ​year.pay/collect a toll Vehicles would be ​fitted with an ​electronictagallowingdrivers to ​pay tolls by ​creditcard, over the ​phone or ​electronically. road/​bridge/motorway tolls a toll ​bridge/highway/motorway
[C] INTERNET, COMMUNICATIONS an ​amount of ​money that you have to ​pay to use the ​internet or to visit particular ​websites: Cable ​companies must ​treat all ​onlinetraffic equally, without ​imposinghigher tolls for ​certaincontent.
[C] US COMMUNICATIONS the ​cost of a ​long-distancephonecall
[S] the ​totalnumber of ​bad things or ​amount of ​damage that ​happens as a ​result of something: The final toll of ​bankruptcies for this ​year is high. The death toll from the earthquake was over a million.financial/economic/emotional toll Layoffs ​carry a large ​human and ​financial toll.
to take its/their toll (on sth/sb)
if something ​takes its toll, it causes ​damage: The ​recession is taking its toll on ​smallbusinesses. The ​building was once a ​model of its ​kind, but ​years of neglect have taken their toll. Stress can take a ​heavy toll on your ​health.
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“toll” in British English

“toll” in American English

“toll” in Business English

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