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Significado de “toll” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "toll" - Diccionario Inglés

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tollnoun

uk   /təʊl/ us   /toʊl/

tollverb [I or T]

uk   /təʊl/ us   /toʊl/
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "toll" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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tollnoun

us   /toʊl/
  • toll noun (MONEY)

[C] an amount of money that you have to pay to travel along some main roads, to cross bridges, etc., or to make telephone calls over long distances: They’re raising the bridge toll to $5.00. The number you dialed is a toll callplease deposit an additional fifty cents.
  • toll noun (SUFFERING)

[U] a high degree of suffering or damage: In addition to the physical destruction caused by the flooding, the emotional toll on its victims was immense.

tollverb [I/T]

us   /toʊl/
(of a large bell) to ring slowly and repeatedly, or to cause a large bell to ring in this way: [I] The town hall bell tolled at noon.
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "toll" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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tollnoun

uk   /təʊl/ us  
[C] TRANSPORT an amount of money that you have to pay to use a road or bridge: Motorists in the region paid more than $11.6 million in tolls last year.pay/collect a toll Vehicles would be fitted with an electronic tag allowing drivers to pay tolls by credit card, over the phone or electronically. road/bridge/motorway tolls a toll bridge/highway/motorway
[C] INTERNET, COMMUNICATIONS an amount of money that you have to pay to use the internet or to visit particular websites: Cable companies must treat all online traffic equally, without imposing higher tolls for certain content.
[C] US COMMUNICATIONS the cost of a long-distance phone call
[S] the total number of bad things or amount of damage that happens as a result of something: The final toll of bankruptcies for this year is high. The death toll from the earthquake was over a million.financial/economic/emotional toll Layoffs carry a large human and financial toll.
to take its/their toll (on sth/sb)
if something takes its toll, it causes damage: The recession is taking its toll on small businesses. The building was once a model of its kind, but years of neglect have taken their toll. Stress can take a heavy toll on your health.
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“toll” in British English

“toll” in American English

“toll” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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Palabra del día

ray

a narrow beam of light, heat, etc. travelling in a straight line from its place of origin

Palabra del día

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

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