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Significado de “wedge” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "wedge" - Diccionario Inglés

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wedgenoun

uk   /wedʒ/ us   /wedʒ/
  • wedge noun (SHAPE)

[C] a piece of metal, wood, rubber, etc. with a pointed edge at one end and a wide edge at the other, either pushed between two objects to keep them still or forced into something to break pieces off it: Push a wedge under the door to keep it open while we're carrying the boxes in. Pieces of stone can be split off by forcing wedges between the layers.
[C] a piece of something, especially food, in the shape of a triangle: Auntie Ann put a huge wedge of cake on my plate. a wedge of cheese

wedgeverb [T]

uk   /wedʒ/ us   /wedʒ/
to make something stay in a particular position by using a wedge: [+ adj] Find something to wedge the window open/closed with.
to put something into a very small or narrow space, so that it cannot move easily: Her shoe came off and got wedged between the bars. I was standing waiting for a bus, wedged between (= fixed between and unable to move away from) two old ladies and their bags of shopping.
(Definition of wedge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "wedge" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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wedgenoun [C]

us   /wedʒ/
a piece of wood, metal, or other material with a pointed edge at one end and a wide edge at the other, used to keep two things apart or, when forced between two things, to break them apart: A wedge under the door kept it open.
wedge
verb [T] us   /wedʒ/
He wedged the window open with a screwdriver.
(Definition of wedge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“wedge” in British English

“wedge” in American English

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