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Significado de “whip” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "whip" - Diccionario Inglés

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whipnoun

uk   us   /wɪp/
  • whip noun (DEVICE FOR HITTING)

[C] a ​piece of ​leather or ​rope that is ​fastened to a ​stick, used for ​hittinganimals or ​people: She ​lashed the ​horsesmercilessly with her ​long whip. The lion-tamer cracked his whip.
  • whip noun (POLITICS)

[C] (in many ​electedpoliticalsystems) a ​member of a ​politicalparty in a ​parliament or in the ​legislature whose ​job is to make ​certain that other ​partymembers are ​present at ​votingtime and also to make ​certain that they ​vote in a ​particular way: Hargreaves is the MP who got into ​trouble with his party's chief whip for ​opposing the ​taxreform. [C] in British ​politics, a written ​orderordering that ​partymembers be ​present in ​parliament when there is to be an ​importantvote, or that they ​vote in a ​particular way: In 1970 he ​defied the three-line (= most ​urgent) whip against EC ​membership.
  • whip noun (SWEET FOOD)

[C or U] UK a ​sweetfood made from ​cream or ​beateneggmixed together with ​fruit

whipverb

uk   us   /wɪp/ (-pp-)
  • whip verb (DO QUICKLY)

[T usually + adv/prep] to ​bring or take something ​quickly: She whipped a ​handkerchief out of her ​pocket and ​wiped his ​face. He whipped the ​covers off the ​bed. I was going to ​pay but before I ​knew it he'd whipped out his ​creditcard. They whipped my ​plate away before I'd ​evenfinished. [I or T, + adv/prep] literary to (​cause something to) ​movequickly and ​forcefully: The ​wind whipped ​across the half-frozen ​lake. A ​fierce, ​freezingwind whipped ​torrentialrain into ​theirfaces.
  • whip verb (BEAT FOOD)

[T] to ​beatfood, ​especiallycream, with a ​specialpiece of ​equipment in ​order to make it ​thick and ​firm: Could you whip the ​cream for me? Try whipping a little ​brandy or other ​liqueur into the ​cream. Top with whipped cream and a ​sprinkle of ​sugar.
(Definition of whip from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "whip" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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whipnoun [C]

 us   /hwɪp, wɪp/
  • whip noun [C] (STRAP)

a ​piece of ​leather or ​ropefastened to a ​stick, used to ​train and ​controlanimals or, esp. in the past, to ​hitpeople: The ​trainercracked his whip, and the ​lionssat in a ​circle.
  • whip noun [C] (POLITICS)

an ​electedrepresentative of a ​politicalparty in a ​legislature whose ​job is to ​gathersupport from other ​legislators (= ​law makers) for ​particularlegislation and to ​encourage them to ​vote the way ​theirpartywants them to

whipverb

 us   /hwɪp, wɪp/ (-pp-)
  • whip verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[always + adv/prep] to ​bring or take (something) ​quickly, or to move ​quickly: [M] They whipped my ​plate away before I’d ​evenfinished. [M] Bill whipped out his ​harmonica. [I] The ​wind whipped around the ​corner of the ​building.
  • whip verb (BEAT FOOD)

[T] to ​beatcream, ​eggs, ​potatoes, etc., with a ​specialutensil in ​order to make it ​thick and ​soft: I still need to whip the ​cream for the ​pie.
  • whip verb (STRAP)

[T] to ​hit a ​person with a whip, esp. for ​punishment, or to ​hit an ​animal with a whip in ​order to ​control it or make it move more ​quickly: To ​train them, owners often whip ​theirpitbulls. fig. Dallas whipped Buffalo 52 to 17 (= ​beat them by this ​score).
(Definition of whip from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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