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Definición de “move” en inglés

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move

verb
 
 
/muːv/
[I or T] to go to a different place in order to live or work, or to make someone do this: The company announced it would be moving staff from Houston to Dallas early next year.move to/into a place I got a promotion last year that meant moving to Brussels. For many years the trend has been for people to move from rural to urban areas.
[I or T] if a store, office, factory, etc. moves, or if someone moves it, it becomes situated in another place: move to/from a place The bank's headquarters have now moved to Amsterdam.move offices/headquarters/operations Airline operations are in the process of being moved to Terminal 2.
[I or T] to change the job that you do, or to make someone do this: If you're not happy working in your current team, we can move you.move sb to sth After only six months at the firm, he was moved to sales.move to/from/into sth She wants to move into corporate finance.
[I] to take action or make progress: One financial analyst said the court decision could prompt the company to move more quickly on the issue.move ahead/forward/away from sth The state is moving ahead with legislation reforms for small businesses.
[I or T] COMMERCE if a product moves, or if a store, company, etc. moves it, it sells quickly: Our latest range of Internet TVs is really moving.
formal MEETINGS to officially suggest something during a meeting: move that I move that we adopt the resolution.
(Definition of move verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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