Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “follow” en inglés

follow

verb
 
 
/ˈfɒləʊ/
GO [I, T] A2 to move behind someone or something and go where they go, sometimes secretly: She followed me into the kitchen. He employed a private detective to follow his wife.Pursuing
HAPPEN [I, T] B1 to happen or come after something: The weeks that followed were the happiest days of my life. There was a bang, followed by a cloud of smoke.Occurring and happening
follow a path/road, etc B1 to travel along a path/road, etc: Follow the main road down to the traffic lights.Travelling
follow instructions/orders/rules, etc B1 to do what the instructions/orders/rules, etc say you should do: I followed your advice and stayed at home.Obedient and compliantObeying and breaking the law
follow sb's example/lead to copy someone's behaviour or ideas: You should follow Meg's example and tidy your room.Copying and copiesForgery
UNDERSTAND [I, T] B1 to understand something: Could you say that again? I didn't quite follow.Understanding and comprehending
BE INTERESTED [T] to be interested in an event or activity: I followed the trial closely.Excited, interested and enthusiastic
as follows B2 used to introduce a list or descriptionQuoting and making references
it follows that used to say that if one thing is true, another thing will also be true: He's big, but it doesn't follow that he's strong. → See also follow in sb's footsteps, follow suitConcluding and deducing
(Definition of follow from the Cambridge Learner's Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “follow” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

hello stranger

said to a person that you know but have not seen for a long time

Palabra del día

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Aprende más 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Aprende más