Définition anglaise de “cause”

Définition de "cause" - Dictionnaire Anglais

See all translations

causenoun

uk /kɔːz/ us /kɑːz/

cause noun (REASON)

B2 [ C or U ] the reason why something, especially something bad, happens:

The police are still trying to establish the cause of the fire.
She had died of natural causes.
I wouldn't tell you without (good) cause (= if there was not a (good) reason).
I believe we have/there is just cause (= a fair reason) for taking this action.

C2 [ U ] a reason to feel something or to behave in a particular way:

He's never given me any cause for concern.

More examples

cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

C1 [ C ] a socially valuable principle that is strongly supported by some people:

They are fighting for a cause - the liberation of their people.
I'll sponsor you for £10 - it's all in a good cause.

More examples

causeverb [ T ]

uk /kɔːz/ us /kɑːz/

B2 to make something happen, especially something bad:

Most heart attacks are caused by blood clots.
[ + two objects ] I hope the children haven't caused you too much trouble.

More examples

causeconjunction

also 'cause uk /kɒz/ us /kɑːz/ informal

(Definition of “cause” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Définition de "cause" - Dictionnaire Anglais Américain

See all translations

causenoun

us /kɔz/

cause noun (REASON)

[ C/U ] something without which something else would not happen:

[ C ] The investigation will determine the cause of the airplane accident.
[ C ] She studied the causes of human behavior.

[ C/U ] Cause is also reason for doing or feeling something:

[ U ] He had just cause to feel disturbed by these events.
[ U ] There is no cause for alarm.

cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

[ C ] an idea or principle strongly supported by some people:

He devoted himself to charitable causes and gave away millions of dollars.
cause
verb [ T ] us /kɔz/

The wind and rain caused several accidents.

(Definition of “cause” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Help us add to the Cambridge Dictionary!

These examples are from external sources. Click on the icon to tell us if any are not OK.

cause

The content of the concept is understandable on merit, but it has not yet been legally recognised and will cause numerous problems.
One cause for concern in this respect, however, is that this principle will only apply to trade between businesses for the time being.
The question is whether you are willing to lend us an ear when something gives us cause for concern and we urgently need your support.
Structural support is said to cause subsidy-dependence.
The use of wood is thus cause for diversification, and especially now, when we are at the stage where communication is moving further away from paper, which is wood-based.
Ionising radiation transfers energy at levels that can induce changes in any matter it penetrates and even cause irreversible damage to human cells.
Intensive farming has a lot to answer for but it is simplistic to see this as the cause of the current outbreak.
Does that not cause them stress of a kind which creates a conflict for us when it comes to caring for animals and our ambition to treat animals well?
On the other hand, we welcome the paragraphs in the report on promoting renewable energies and monitoring industrial activities which cause pollution.
I totally understand that all tobacco products are dangerous to human health and cause different types of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.