Any more or anymore ? - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Any more or anymore?

from English Grammar Today

Any more as a determiner

We use any more as a determiner to describe ‘an indefinite quantity of something’. Any more is similar to some more. Some more is more common in affirmative statements; any more is more common in questions, in clauses with if and in sentences with negative words such as hardly, never, scarcely:

Would you like any more tea?

If you find any more books, please let us know.

She doesn’t want any more contact with him.

There are hardly any more people here than last month.

Yes, I’d like some more information about trains to Berlin, please.

Not: Yes, I’d like any more information about

Any more as an adverb

Any more is also an adverb and has the meaning of ‘no longer’ or ‘in the past but not now.’ In this meaning, we use it in end position:

We don’t go to Cornwall on holiday any more. (We used to go in the past but not now.)

The cost of electricity is not cheap any more.

Especially in American English, any more, as an adverb, can be written as one word, anymore:

He doesn’t cycle anymore.

(“Any more or anymore ?” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press. Need grammar practice? Try English Grammar Today with Workbook.)
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