Classic or classical? - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionaries Online Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Classic or classical?

from English Grammar Today

Classic: adjective

Classic means ‘high quality’. In particular, we use it to mean something that is valued because it has a traditional style:

She was wearing a classic dark blue skirt.

It’s a classic motorbike from the 1940s.

Classic also means a perfect or most typical example of something:

The show is a classic example of TV made for children.

Classic: noun

We can use a classic and the classics to refer to the greatest and most famous works of literature from the past:

Tolstoy’s ‘War and Peace’ is a classic.

I never read modern novels. I always prefer the classics, such as Dickens and Jane Austen.

Classics without an article means the academic subject which includes the study of Ancient Greek and Latin:

My sister is studying Classics at Manchester University right now.

Classical: adjective

We use classical to refer to the culture of the past and to art forms which belong to a long formal tradition:

Mozart is probably the best-known classical composer.

She’s only eight years old and she has learned to dance both classical and modern ballet.

(“Classic or classical?” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press.)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Just who is driving this thing?
Just who is driving this thing?
by ,
May 03, 2016
by Colin McIntosh Do you remember Herbie the Love Bug? Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle car in a string of Walt Disney movies. In typical Disney anthropomorphic style, Herbie goes his own way, falls in love, cries, plays jokes, and generally has a mind of his own. While the new driverless cars, like those being

Read More 

Word of the Day

galaxy

one of the independent groups of stars in the universe

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More