More - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionaries Online
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We use the quantifier more to talk about additional quantities, amounts and degree. More is a comparative word.

More with nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs, prepositions

We use more with different classes of words. We use more after verbs but before every other word class:

[instructions on a computer screen]

Click here for more answers. (more + noun)

My father was more upset than I had ever seen him. (more + adjective)

The interest rate has gone up again. We’re going to have to pay more. (verb + more)

[talking about a car]

It will start more easily, run more smoothly and deliver more power. (more, + adverb, more + adverb, more + noun)

Who’s more in need of a good night’s sleep, you or me? (more + prepositional phrase)

More with nouns

We can use more with plural countable nouns and uncountable nouns:

There are more chairs in the room opposite if you need them. (countable)

We need more information before we can make a decision. (uncountable)

More of

When we use more before articles (a/an, the), demonstratives (this, that), possessives (my, your) or pronouns (him, it), we need of:

Can I have more of that delicious cake you baked?

How many more of my relatives have you not met, I wonder?

I think we’re going to see a lot more of her.

More without a noun (as a pronoun)

We usually leave out the noun after more when the noun is obvious:

I’d like some coffee. Is there any more? (more coffee)

More and more

We often use more and more to emphasise an increase or decrease in something:

More and more people are using the Internet every day.

More or longer?

When we are talking about more time, we usually use longer rather than more:

Would you like to stay a bit longer?

Not: Would you like to stay a bit more?

(“More” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press. Need grammar practice? Try English Grammar Today with Workbook.)
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