No longer, not any longer - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionaries Online Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

No longer, not any longer

from English Grammar Today

We use no longer or not any longer to talk about the end of an action or state. No longer is more formal:

One day I could stand it no longer.

I couldn’t stand it any longer. I walked out and didn’t go back.

No longer often comes in the normal mid position for adverbs (between the subject and main verb, or after the modal verb or first auxiliary verb, or after be as a main verb), especially in more formal styles:

She no longer wears the dull colours of her former life and now dresses in bright, fashionable clothes.

In very formal styles, we can use no longer in front position, with the subject and verb inverted:

No longer does he dream of becoming famous. He knows his life will be very ordinary.

No longer or not any longer are the opposite of still.

Compare

She no longer works here.

She doesn’t work here any longer.

She isn’t working here now.

She still works here.

She is working here now.

We use Not any longer as a response on its own. However, we don’t use No longer as a response on its own:

A:

Are you still living in London?

B:

Not any longer.

Not: No longer. or No, not still.

(“No longer, not any longer” from English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press.)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

cracker

a thin, flat, hard biscuit, especially one eaten with cheese

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More