Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

What’s happened to my Cambridge Dictionaries Online page?

Cambridge Dictionaries Online has teamed up with Memrise to offer a whole new way for you to learn vocabulary.

You may notice that some of our pages look different. This is because we’re experimenting with different designs and different ways of presenting Memrise learning methods for some of our most frequently visited words. Right now, you’ll see these experiments on just a few dictionary pages. In the months ahead we expect to add Memrise to most of the entries we offer.

For more than ten years, Cambridge has provided the world’s best learner’s dictionaries online for free. Millions of people every month rely on Cambridge to help them understand what words mean.

Memrise has designed a scientific method of learning that’s as simple and intuitive as possible, but above all, Memrise makes learning as fast as possible. Memrise breaks what you have to learn into little chunks; it helps you form beautiful, clear memories, and it makes sure you never forget what you learn, with adaptively timed reminders and tests.

We’re taking Cambridge’s clear, easy-to-understand definitions and real-world examples and offering them in a Memrise learning experience. Now you’ll be able to do more than just look up a word; you’ll be able to learn and remember it forever.

Learning's a game. Whatever you are learning, the most important thing is to enjoy yourself. Learning English vocabulary with Cambridge and Memrise is a game you play with your friends. It all takes place in the Vocabulary Garden, where words begin life as seeds, are nurtured in your greenhouse (short term memory) and then transplanted to your garden (long term memory).

We hope you enjoy the Memrise learning experience on Cambridge Dictionaries Online. We would love to hear what you think of it. Please contact us .

Paul Heacock
Publishing Manager, Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Word of the Day

sail

When a boat or a ship sails, it travels on the water.

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

dumbwalking noun

April 20, 2015
walking slowly, without paying attention to the world around you because you are consulting a smartphone He told me dumbwalking probably wouldn’t be a long-term problem.

Read More