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English definition of “at”

at

preposition  /æt, ət/ us  

at preposition (PLACE/TIME)

used to show a particular place or a particular time: I’ll meet you at the theater at 7:45 tonight. Call me at work. There’s someone at the door (= outside the door). I wasn’t here to meet you because I was in Detroit at the time (= then).

at preposition (DIRECTION)

in the direction of: They waved at us as we drove by. She aimed at the target, but missed.

at preposition (CAUSE)

used to show the cause of something, esp. a feeling: I was so happy at the news.

at preposition (CONDITION)

used to show a state, condition, or continuous activity: The country was at peace/war. I love watching the children at play. She was hard at work (= working hard).

at preposition (AMOUNT)

used to show a price, temperature, rate, speed, etc.: They’re selling these coats at 30% off this week.

at preposition (JUDGMENT)

used to show the activity in which someone’s ability is being judged: I’m really not very good at math. Sheila is really terrible at getting to places on time.

at preposition (THE MOST)

used before a superlative: I’m afraid we can only pay you $12 an hour at (the) most. At best you’ll get to speak to some assistant – you’ll never reach anyone important.
(Definition of at from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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