drive - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “drive”

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drive

verb  us   /drɑɪv/ (past tense drove  /droʊv/ , past participle driven  /ˈdrɪv·ən/ )

drive verb (USE VEHICLE)

[I/T] to travel in a motor vehicle, esp. as the person who operates it: [T] We drove 40 miles to visit my aunt. [I] She drove through Pennsylvania to Ohio. [I] She never learned how to drive (= operate a car). [T] I’ll drive you to the station (= take you there in my car).

drive verb (FORCE)

[T] to force someone or something to go somewhere or do something: He drove a nail into the wall. He was driven (= His actions were caused) by greed.

drive verb (PROVIDE POWER)

[T] to provide the power to make a machine operate: The water pump is driven by a windmill.
Phrasal verbs

drive

noun  us   /drɑɪv/

drive noun (TRIP)

[C] a trip in a motor vehicle: We have a 200-mile drive ahead of us. [C] A drive is also a road for cars and is sometimes used as part of a name: Riverside Drive

drive noun (PLANNED EFFORT)

[C] a planned, usually long-lasting, effort to achieve something: The university sponsored a blood drive (= effort to collect blood) for the Red Cross.

drive noun (FORCE)

[C/U] strong determination to do or achieve something: [U] Intelligence isn’t enough – you’ve got to have the drive to succeed.
(Definition of drive from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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