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English definition of “follow”

follow

verb  /ˈfɑl·oʊ/ us  

follow verb (MOVE AFTER)

[I/T] to move along after someone or something, or to move along a route or path: [T] The dog followed us home. [I] He drove ahead and we followed in our own car. [T] Follow this road for the next two miles. [I/T] To follow someone is also to move along after a person in order to watch where that person is going: [T] She had the feeling she was being followed.

follow verb (HAPPEN AFTER)

[I/T] to happen after something else in order or time: [I] We were not prepared for what followed. [T] A reception will follow the meeting, so please stay.

follow verb (OBEY)

[T] to obey someone, or to act according to something: Follow the instructions in taking the medicine. I decided to follow her advice. If you follow the signs, you will have no trouble finding the airport.

follow verb (UNDERSTAND)

[T] to understand: He spoke so rapidly we could hardly follow what he said.

follow verb (INTERESTED IN)

[T] to be actively interested in something, or to give your attention to something: Do you follow football? We’ve followed her political career for many years.

follow verb (BE RESULT)

[I] to happen as a result, or to be a likely result: [+ that clause] Fuel prices for transporting goods have increased, so it would follow that those prices are getting passed on to customers.
(Definition of follow from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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