get Definition in Cambridge American English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of "get" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

getverb

 us   /ɡet/ (present participle getting, past participle gotten  /ˈɡɑt·ən/ or got  /ɡɑt/ )

get verb (OBTAIN)

[T] to take something into your possession, or have something happen that you accept or receive: He climbed over the fence to get his ball back. Monique raised her hand to get the teacher’s attention. Can I get you a drink? Dad keeps telling me to get a job. What did you get on the test (= What mark did you receive)? I think she gets (= earns) about $10 an hour. We don’t get much snow in this part of the country (= It does not often snow). [T] To get something often means to buy or pay for it: He went to the store to get milk.

get verb (BECOME)

[L] to become or start to be: Your coffee is getting cold. He’s gotten so big, I hardly recognized him. They’re getting married later this year. Tom got lost in the woods. What time do you get off work? We’d better get going/moving or we’ll be late.

get verb (BECOME ILL WITH)

[T] to become ill with a disease: Everyone seems to be getting the flu.

get verb (CAUSE)

[T] to cause something to be done or persuade someone to do something: The bed is too wide – we’ll never get it through the door. I can’t get this printer to work!

get verb (PREPARE)

[T] to prepare a meal: Why don’t you get supper ready?

get verb (MOVE)

[always + adv/prep] to move in a particular direction: [I] Get away from that wet paint! [I] He got down on his hands and knees to look for his contact lens. [T] Her throat was so sore that she had trouble getting the medicine down (= swallowing it). [I] I hit my head as I was getting into the car. [M] Momma said we have to get these wet clothes off (= remove them). [T] Get your feet off the couch (= move them off it). [always + adv/prep] To get off a road when you are driving means to turn onto another road: [I] Get off the expressway at exit 43. [always + adv/prep] To get off a train, bus, or aircraft is to leave it: [I] Get off at Union Station.

get verb (TRAVEL)

[T] to go into a vehicle or aircraft for traveling: We could call for a taxi or get the bus.

get verb (ARRIVE)

[I always + adv/prep] to arrive at a place or reach a stage in a process: We only got as far as Denver when the car broke down. What time does he normally get home from work? We’re not getting very far (= not advancing) with this computer program, are we?

get verb (UNDERSTAND)

[T] to understand: I think I got the general idea of the chapter. The music was loud and I didn’t get what he said. I never said he was mean – you’ve got it all wrong (= you are confused about this matter).

get verb (CALCULATE)

[T] to calculate the answer to a mathematical problem: What do you get if you divide 20 by 4?

get verb (ANSWER)

[T] to answer a ringing telephone, a knock at the door, etc.: Hey, Juan, someone’s at the door – would you get it, please?

get verb (HIT)

[T] to hit someone, esp. with something thrown or a bullet: My first throw missed, but the second got him in the leg.

get verb (ANNOY)

[T] infml to cause someone to feel slightly angry: It gets me when I have to both cook dinner and clean the dishes.

get verb (CAUSE EMOTIONS)

[T] infml to have an emotional effect on someone: That scene in the movie, when the father and daughter are reunited, always gets me.
(Definition of get from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of get?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “get” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
stretch the truth

to say something that is not completely honest in order to make someone or something seem better than it really is

Word of the Day

July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
by Liz Walter,
July 01, 2015
With America’s Independence Day on the 4th and France’s Bastille Day on the 14th, July certainly has a revolutionary theme, so this blog looks at words and phrases we use to talk about the dramatic and nation-changing events that these days celebrate. In particular, it focuses on one of the most important

Read More 

generation pause noun
generation pause noun
July 06, 2015
informal young adults who are not able to do things previously typical for their age group such as buy a home or start a family because of lack of money Meanwhile, a new study released last week revealed a quarter of Brits believe they’ll never own a property, leading them to be

Read More