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English definition of “hand”

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hand

noun  /hænd/ us  

hand noun (BODY PART)

[C] the part of the body at the end of the arm that includes the fingers and is used for holding, moving, touching, and feeling things: Keep both hands on the steering wheel. When eating, most Americans hold the fork in their right hand. He took my hand (= held it with his hand) as we walked along.

hand noun (CLOCK)

[C] one of the two long narrow parts on a clock or watch that move to show the time: the hour/minute hand

hand noun (CARDS)

[C] the set of cards that a player is given in a game: a winning/losing hand

hand noun (HELP)

[C usually sing] help with doing something: Can I give you a hand with those bags?

hand noun (WORKER)

[C] a person who does physical work, esp. as one of a team or group: a farm hand

hand noun (CLAPPING)

[C usually sing] a period of clapping to show enjoyment of a performance: Let’s give this band a big hand.

hand

verb [T]  /hænd/ us  

hand verb [T] (PUT INTO HAND)

to put something from your hand into someone else’s hand: Would you please hand me a pencil?
(Definition of hand from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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