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English definition of “law”

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law

noun  // us  

law noun (RULE)

[C/U] a rule made by a government that states how people may and may not behave in society and in business, and that often orders particular punishments if they do not obey, or a system of such rules: [U] civil/criminal law [U] federal/state law [C] We have a law in this state that drivers must wear seatbelts. [U] She’s studying law at Georgetown University. [U] Playing loud music late at night is against the law. [C/U] The law is also the police: [U] He got in trouble with the law as a young man.Law and order Law and order is the condition of a society in which laws are obeyed, and social life and business go on in an organized way.Law enforcement Law enforcement is the government activity of keeping the public peace and causing laws to be obeyed: Several law enforcement officers were sent to Mexico to bring the prisoner back.

law noun (PRINCIPLE)

[C] a general rule that states what always happens when the same conditions exist: the laws of physics
Translations of “law”
in Korean 법학, 법…
in Arabic قانون…
in French loi(s), législation, loi…
in Turkish yasa, kanun, hukuk…
in Italian legge, diritto…
in Chinese (Traditional) 規定, 法,法律, 法律制度,法律體系…
in Russian закон, право, правоведение…
in Polish prawo…
in Spanish ley…
in Portuguese Direito, lei…
in German das Recht, das Gesetz…
in Catalan dret, llei…
in Japanese 法学, 法律…
in Chinese (Simplified) 规定, 法,法律, 法律制度,法律体系…
(Definition of law from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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