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English definition of “off”

off

adjective, adverb [not gradable]  /ɔf/ us  

off adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT OPERATING)

(esp. of a machine, electrical device, light, etc.) not operating because it is not switched on: Was the computer on or off when you left? Turn the engine off.

off adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT AT)

not at work or school, esp. being at home or on vacation: I’m going to take a week off to work on my house. I’m off next week. The kids get off early from school today. off duty To be off duty is to not be working, usually because you have finished work for the day: She goes off duty at midnight. An off-duty police officer on his way home interrupted a crime in progress.

off adjective, adverb [not gradable] (BELOW USUAL LEVEL)

below the usual standard or rate: Sales have been off this month. He’s a good tennis player but had an off day and lost in straight sets. They took 10% off (= below the usual price) because I paid in cash.

off adjective, adverb [not gradable] (STOPPED)

(of an arranged event) stopped or given up in advance: Last night’s baseball game was called off because of rain.

off

preposition, adjective, adverb [not gradable]  /ɔf/ us  

off preposition, adjective, adverb [not gradable] (AWAY FROM)

away from a place or position, esp. the present place or position: He drove off at high speed. She’s off to Canada next week. The sign says, "Keep off the grass."

off

preposition, adverb [not gradable]  /ɔf/ us  

off preposition, adverb [not gradable] (REMOVED)

used with actions in which something is removed or removes itself from another thing: I think I’ll take my jacket off. I can’t get the lid off this jar. He fell off his bike. Did you leave the phone off the hook (= not put back in such a way that a call is ended)?

off preposition, adverb [not gradable] (FAR AWAY)

far away in time or space: Graduation is still a long way off. That’s not the right answer, but you’re not far off.

off

preposition  /ɔf/ us  

off preposition (NEAR TO)

near to: The island is just off the coast of Florida.

off

adverb [not gradable]  /ɔf/ us  

off adverb [not gradable] (TAKEN AWAY)

in such a way as to be taken away or removed, esp. because of having been used or killed: to pay off debts Exercise burns off fat. They were all killed off by disease.

off adverb [not gradable] (CLOSED)

in such a way as to be separated: to mark off 10 feet The children’s play area is fenced off for safety reasons.
(Definition of off from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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