Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “out of”

out of

preposition  /ˈoʊt əv/ us  

out of preposition (OUTSIDE)

from a place or position inside something to a place or position that is beyond it or not part of it: I jumped out of bed and ran downstairs. My daughter just got out of the hospital. If you are out of an activity, you are no longer involved in it: He decided to get out of teaching. out of sight If something is out of sight it is hidden or too far away to be seen

out of preposition (NOT IN A STATE OF)

not in the best or in a correct state, or not in a particular state or condition: The picture was out of focus. James has been out of work for over a month. This dress is out of style (= no longer fashionable). out of character If a person’s behavior is out of character, it is very different from the usual way that person behaves: It was out of character for Charles not to offer to help. out of control Someone or something out of control is difficult to manage: The weeds in the garden are out of control. out of print A book that is out of print is no longer available. out of season When a fruit or vegetable is out of season, it is a time of the year when it does not usually grow locally and must be obtained from another region or country: Tomatoes are out of season now.

out of preposition (WITH)

with the help of: I paid for the computer out of my savings.

out of preposition (BY USING)

(of a material or substance) by using, to produce something: The dress was made out of velvet.

out of preposition (NOT HAVE)

in a condition in which you have no more of something, esp. because it has all been used: We’ll soon be out of gas. I’m out of patience with her. We’re out of time – we’ve got to leave right now.

out of preposition (COMING FROM)

coming from: She copied the pattern out of a magazine.

out of preposition (BECAUSE OF)

because of: She volunteered out of a sense of duty.

out of preposition (FROM AMONG)

from among a group or a particular number: The poll showed that six out of ten people approved of the job the president is doing.
(Definition of out of from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of out of?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “out of” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

long time no see

said when you meet someone who you haven't seen for a long period of time

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Read More