out of Definition in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Definition of "out of" - American English Dictionary

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out ofpreposition

 us   /ˈoʊt əv/

out of preposition (OUTSIDE)

from a place or position inside something to a place or position that is beyond it or not part of it: I jumped out of bed and ran downstairs. My daughter just got out of the hospital. If you are out of an activity, you are no longer involved in it: He decided to get out of teaching.out of sight If something is out of sight it is hidden or too far away to be seen

out of preposition (NOT IN A STATE OF)

not in the best or in a correct state, or not in a particular state or condition: The picture was out of focus. James has been out of work for over a month. This dress is out of style (= no longer fashionable).out of character If a person’s behavior is out of character, it is very different from the usual way that person behaves: It was out of character for Charles not to offer to help.out of control Someone or something out of control is difficult to manage: The weeds in the garden are out of control.out of print A book that is out of print is no longer available.out of season When a fruit or vegetable is out of season, it is a time of the year when it does not usually grow locally and must be obtained from another region or country: Tomatoes are out of season now.

out of preposition (WITH)

with the help of: I paid for the computer out of my savings.

out of preposition (BY USING)

(of a material or substance) by using, to produce something: The dress was made out of velvet.

out of preposition (NOT HAVE)

in a condition in which you have no more of something, esp. because it has all been used: We’ll soon be out of gas. I’m out of patience with her. We’re out of time – we’ve got to leave right now.

out of preposition (COMING FROM)

coming from: She copied the pattern out of a magazine.

out of preposition (BECAUSE OF)

because of: She volunteered out of a sense of duty.

out of preposition (FROM AMONG)

from among a group or a particular number: The poll showed that six out of ten people approved of the job the president is doing.
(Definition of out of from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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