press Definition in Cambridge American English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of "press" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

pressverb

 us   /pres/

press verb (PUSH)

[I/T] to push firmly against something that is fixed in position: [T] I pressed the volume button on the remote. [I always + adv/prep] The crowd pressed up against the doors. [I always + adv/prep] He pressed down hard on the accelerator, and the car shot ahead. [I/T] When you press clothes, you use an iron (= a heavy device with a flat base) to make them smooth.

press verb (PERSUADE)

[T] to try to persuade or cause someone to do something, or to act in a determined way to cause something to be accepted: The police pressed her to identify the man she had seen. Marquez will visit Washington to press his country’s case. She decided not to press charges against him (= make an official complaint).

pressnoun

 us   /pres/

press noun (DEVICE)

[C] any of various devices that use force: a pants press a garlic press a printing press

press noun (NEWSPAPERS)

[U] newspapers, magazines, and other businesses that communicate news to the public by print, television, or radio, or the people who work to prepare and present the news: Is the press too conservative? [U] Good/bad press is the positive or negative reaction of newspapers, magazines, etc., to a person or thing: At some point, every president has complained about bad press.

press noun (PUBLISHER)

[C] a business that prints and produces books or other printed material: Cambridge University Press
(Definition of press from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of press?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “press” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
field event

a sports event in which athletes take part one after the other rather than racing or competing together

Word of the Day

Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
by Kate Woodford,
July 29, 2015
A reader of this blog recently asked for a post on idioms that are used in everyday English. This seemed like a reasonable request. After all, if you are going to make the effort to learn a set of English idioms, you want those idioms to be useful. The question, then, was

Read More 

exoskeleton noun
exoskeleton noun
July 27, 2015
a robotic device which goes around the legs and part of the body of a person who cannot walk and allows them to move independently and in an upright position The device, known as an exoskeleton, is strapped to the outside of a person’s limbs and can then be controlled by them.

Read More