Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “angle”

See all translations

angle

noun [C] uk   /ˈæŋ.ɡl̩/ us  

angle noun [C] (SPACE BETWEEN LINES)

C1 the space between two lines or surfaces at the point at which they touch each other, measured in degrees: The interior angles of a square are right angles or angles of 90 degrees. The boat settled into the mud at a 35° angle/at an angle of 35°.at an angle C1 not horizontal or vertical, but sloping in one direction: The picture was hanging at an angle. He wore his hat at a jaunty angle. the corner of a building, table, or anything with straight sides
More examples

angle noun [C] (POSITION)

C1 a position from which something is looked at: The tower is visible from every angle/all angles. I realized I was looking at it from the wrong angle.

angle noun [C] (WAY OF THINKING)

C1 a way of considering, judging, or dealing with something: Try looking at the problem from another angle/from my angle. The press was looking for a new/fresh angle on the situation.

angle

verb [T] uk   /ˈæŋ.ɡl̩/ us  

angle verb [T] (SLOPE)

to aim, turn, or position something in a direction that is not horizontal or vertical: The stage had been steeply angled (= was sloping very noticeably).

angle verb [T] (DIRECT)

to direct information at a particular group of people: The magazine is angled at the 20 to 35-year-old women's market.
angled
adjective uk   /ˈæŋ.ɡl̩d/ us  
His angled shot (= from the side, not from straight in front) beat the goalkeeper from 20 yards.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of angle from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of angle?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “angle” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

luck

the force that causes things, especially good things, to happen to you by chance and not as a result of your own efforts or abilities

Word of the Day

A certain je ne sais quoi: French words and phrases used in English

by Liz Walter,
January 21, 2015
It is an odd irony that the more sophisticated your use of English is, the more likely you are to use French words and phrases. Or, to be more accurate, ones you know to be French – words such as ballet, au pair, abattoir, fiancé, café, and restaurant are so entrenched in

Read More 

micro pig noun

January 26, 2015
an extremely small pig, bred to be a pet Micro pigs have become popular pets recently, with famous owners including Victoria Beckham, Paris Hilton and Olympic diver, Tom Daley.

Read More